Police investigating missing chemicals at CCAC

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Pittsburgh police said Wednesday that they are attempting to determine who took chemicals from a laboratory at the Community College of Allegheny County's Allegheny campus.

Pittsburgh public safety spokeswoman Sonya Toler said it's "safe to say" some of the chemicals in the lab "were stolen, taken, removed." She said police are still working with the school to determine exactly which chemicals are missing.

Police were called to the school shortly after it opened Tuesday morning. School spokeswoman Elizabeth Johnston said Tuesday that it appeared as though at least one person had combined chemicals in the lab that, when used inappropriately, have the potential to cause an adverse reaction.

No arrests have been made.

The local FBI office has also joined the investigation, and state officials have been notified because CCAC receives some state funding, Ms. Toler said.

Gregory Heeb, supervisory special agent in the FBI's Pittsburgh office, said Wednesday, "The FBI is contributing to the investigation, as requested by the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police. As always, the resources of the FBI, including the Pittsburgh FBI's Hazardous Materials Coordinator and FBI Bomb Technicians are available to assist, as needed."

CCAC said in a press release that it will implement safety measures including requiring students and employees to present valid CCAC identification to enter buildings and requiring visitors to sign in at the campus security station.


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