Ex-PPG official posts bond in fatal New Hampshire crash


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When he joined PPG Industries in September 2009 as its chief financial officer designate, Robert Dellinger was heralded in a company news release as a key hire because of the depth of international experience he brought to the coatings and glass corporation, which was seeking to raise its global profile.

Mr. Dellinger, then 49, landed at the Pittsburgh company after stints as CFO at Sprint Corp. and Delphi Corp. and after a nearly 20-year career with General Electric Co., which included running GE businesses in Europe and Asia.

But less than two years after arriving at PPG, Mr. Dellinger abruptly left, citing personal health reasons.

This week, Mr. Dellinger told authorities he was depressed and attempting suicide when the truck he was driving on a New Hampshire highway last Saturday slammed into an SUV, killing a pregnant woman and her fiance.

Mr. Dellinger, who now resides in Sunapee, N.H., was charged with two counts of manslaughter and on Thursday posted bail of $250,000 cash. A spokesman at the Grafton County House of Corrections in Haverhill, N.H., said he expected Mr. Dellinger to be released after processing late Thursday.

During an arraignment hearing on Wednesday, Susan Morrell, senior assistant attorney general for New Hampshire, said Mr. Dellinger fought with his wife over his anti-depressant medication before driving his truck on Interstate 89 in Lebanon, N.H., where the fatal accident occurred.

Killed were Jason Timmons, 29, and Amanda Murphy, 24, both of Wilder, Vt. Their unborn daughter also died.

Police said Mr. Dellinger's pickup crossed a grassy median and became airborne before it slammed into the couple's vehicle. He sustained minor injuries and was treated at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center prior to his arraignment.

He is scheduled for a hearing on probable cause on Dec. 19, said Ms. Morrell.

During the arraignment, Mr. Dellinger's attorney, R. Peter Decato, said his client has been receiving treatment for mental health issues. He said Mr. Dellinger led a "productive and exemplary life."

PPG declined to comment on Mr. Dellinger's tenure at the company or to provide specifics about his departure.

"While we can confirm that Mr. Dellinger is no longer employed by PPG, it is against PPG's policy to provide further information regarding former employees," said Bryan Iams, vice president, corporate and government affairs.

When he left in June 2011, Mr. Dellinger received a severance package valued at more than $1 million that included a lump sum cash payment of $800,000 and an additional $250,000 in lieu of a bonus he might have earned in 2011, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

After departing PPG, Mr. Dellinger worked for a time as the chief financial officer at Dynamics Inc., a Cheswick company that develops and produces electronic payment cards. Officials there could not be reached for comment.

Mr. Dellinger and his wife, Deborah Dellinger, still own an home in Edgeworth. According to Allegheny County real estate property records, the home was purchased for $2.6 million in 2009 and is currently assessed at approximately $2.3 million.

According to a report in the Valley News in Lebanon, N.H., the Dellinger family owns four properties in Sunapee, including at least two located on Lake Sunapee.

Mr. Dellinger graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a bachelor's in economics and a minor in accounting.

Joyce Gannon: jgannon@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1580. Staff writer Rich Lord and The Associated Press contributed.


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