New civil trial date set in Jordan Miles' case against Pittsburgh police

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Jordan Miles, the Homewood man who claimed three city of Pittsburgh police officers beat him on a frozen night in 2010 on Tioga Street, will get another chance to convince a jury starting July 8.

Last year, a civil trial that spanned July and August resulted in a hung jury on accusations that the police falsely arrested and beat Mr. Miles and exoneration for the officers on a malicious prosecution claim. The new trial will focus only on Mr. Miles' claims of false arrest and excessive force.

Today attorneys for Mr. Miles, the officers and the city of Pittsburgh met in the chambers of U.S. District Chief Judge Gary L. Lancaster and reached agreement on the new trial date.

The city has settled with Mr. Miles and is no longer a defendant but would have to pay any verdict against the officers and has helped fund their defense.

Mr. Miles claimed that city officers Richard Ewing, Michael Saldutte and David Sisak stopped him at night on Jan. 12, 2010, as he walked from his mother's house to his grandmother's house.

He said they did not identify themselves and beat and arrested him. He was then a senior at the Pittsburgh High School for the Creative and Performing Arts and claimed that he subsequently failed to complete college.

The officers told a jury that they saw Mr. Miles acting suspiciously between two houses.

They said that when they identified themselves and tried to question him, he ran.

They mistakenly thought he had a gun and arrested him using only the force necessary, the officers said.

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Rich Lord: rlord@post-gazette.com, 412-263-1542 and on Twitter: @richelord.


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