Gormley named dean of Duquesne law school

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Ken Gormley, an expert in constitutional law, was named dean of the Duquesne University School of Law today.

Mr. Gormley has served as interim dean of the school since 2008.

"We are delighted to have such an accomplished teacher-scholar, active member of the Bar and influential author leading our School of Law," said Duquesne University President Charles Dougherty. "Our aspiration is to be a nationally prominent law school, and Professor Gormley is just the person to take us there. We're very grateful for the work of an exceptional search committee in bringing us to this defining moment for our School of Law."

Mr. Gormley was named interim dean after Don Guter was ousted as dean in December 2008, sparking a campus outcry.

Mr. Gormley, who joined the law school faculty in 1994, was the first academic to serve as president of the Allegheny County Bar Association. He also served as associate vice president for interdisciplinary scholarship and special projects at Duquesne.

An expert in constitutional law, Mr. Gormley teaches courses on constitutional law, state constitutional law, political and civil rights, and the First Amendment. He has testified before the United States Senate on topics including wiretapping, presidential pardons and the independent counsel law.

Mr. Gormley is the author of "The Death of American Virtue: Clinton vs. Starr," published in February. He also wrote "Archibald Cox: Conscience of a Nation."

"It is a great honor to be selected to lead Duquesne's School of Law at this important time in its history," said Mr. Gormley. "As we prepare to celebrate our hundredth anniversary next year, the Law School is nicely positioned to build upon its rich tradition of training excellent, ethical, highly-qualified lawyers. I am grateful for the opportunity to further contribute to and continue this legacy."

A resident of Forest Hills, Mr. Gormley is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh and earned his law degree at Harvard Law School.



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