Westinghouse chairman nominated to head Pitt board


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Westinghouse Electric Co. Chairman Stephen R. Tritch has been nominated to become chairman of the board of trustees of the University of Pittsburgh.

The recommendation was announced yesterday by the board's nominating committee. The full board is scheduled to vote on June 26. The previous board chair, Ralph J. Cappy, retired chief justice of Pennsylvania, died suddenly last month.

"For the past six years, the university benefited immeasurably from the leadership provided by Chief Justice Cappy as chairperson of our board of trustees," said Pitt trustee Sam Zacharias, chairman of the nominating committee, in a statement. "We are very fortunate that Steve Tritch -- someone with wide-ranging national and international experience, who has built an extraordinary record of professional accomplishment, and who has demonstrated a deep commitment to Pitt and to this region, is willing to serve as our next chair."

Mr. Tritch, who earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1971 and an M.B.A. in 1977 from Pitt, said, "My own career grew out of the education that I received at Pitt, and I always will be grateful to the university for that.

"Over time, it also has become increasingly clear that Pitt's strength is critical to the progress of the entire region."

Mr. Tritch retired as president and CEO of Westinghouse Electric Co. last year. He had worked for Westinghouse for 37 years, including six as president and CEO. He has been chairman of Westinghouse since 2006.


Correction/Clarification: (Published June 13, 2009) Westinghouse Electric Co. Chairman Stephen R. Tritch was nominated to become chairman of the board of trustees at the University of Pittsburgh. A headline on this story as originally published June 12, 2009 incorrectly stated he was nominated to the board, of which he already was a member.

Eleanor can be reached at echute@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1955.


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