Bond for Carnegie Mellon professor charged with 3 DUIs could be revoked today

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A Carnegie Mellon University computer science professor charged with drunken driving three times in eight days could go to jail today, much to the relief of his neighbors in Squirrel Hill.

Allegheny County Common Pleas Judge Anthony Mariani was scheduled to hold a bond revocation hearing this morning for Jeffrey Hunker, 51.

The district attorney's office yesterday asked for the hearing because prosecutors fear Mr. Hunker may hurt someone or himself.

"I think that's great," said Lori Kaplan, whose lawn Mr. Hunker is accused of driving across on Aug. 17, when police said he backed out of his driveway at high speed, ran over a tree, hit a car and smashed into the home of Dr. Kenneth Levin on Squirrel Hill Avenue.

Parts of Mr. Hunker's BMW were still on Mrs. Kaplan's lawn this week.

After police arrested him that day, a district judge released Mr. Hunker on his own recognizance. But police arrested him again on DUI charges the next day and again on Sunday after receiving a call that he was suicidal.

His preliminary hearing was supposed to be on Monday but was postponed until Sept. 9 because he didn't have a lawyer.

Neighbors were concerned that Mr. Hunker, whom many residents say has often been seen stumbling in the street intoxicated, will continue to drive between now and then.

The district attorney's office shared that concern. Mike Manko, office spokesman, said Judge Mariani modified Mr. Hunker's bond to prohibit him from driving, allowing police to take him into custody if he violates the order.

Mr. Hunker, former head of cyber security in the Clinton administration, came to Carnegie Mellon in 2001 to become dean of the university's H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management.

He took personal leave in 2003.

Mr. Hunker and Carnegie Mellon have repeatedly refused to comment on the case.


Torsten Ove can be reached at tove@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1510.


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