Clark's 34 points push Duquesne by La Salle, 103-82

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Duquesne pulled together a second-half rally, got a wonderful performance from junior swingman Bill Clark and earned a 103-82 victory against visiting La Salle (12-12, 3-7) today at the Palumbo Center in an Atlantic 10 Conference clash.

Clark posted a career-high 34 points and also surpassed 1,000 career points early in the second half, becoming the 34th player in school history to eclipse the mark. He went 11 for 14 from the field.

Melquan Bolding added 24 points for the Dukes, and Damian Saunders had 13 points and 14 rebounds.

The Dukes (13-12, 4-7) broke open a game that was tied at halftime, rocketed to an 86-67 lead with 7 minutes remaining and sailed home from there.

Rodney Green paced La Salle with 27 points.

Duquesne coach Ron Everhart brought back this afternoon the "10-40" tactic, wherein five players play for a short burst and then are substituted -- in a wholesale manner -- by five more players, who then play in a short, wide-open burst.

Everhart did it at the beginning of the game and used it the better portion of the first half.

It was a strategy Everhart used regularly, and out of necessity due to lack of depth, in his first season of the Bluff, in 2006-07.

The Dukes looked in deep trouble in the early going, falling behind 24-17, 39-27 and then reaching their biggest deficit of the first half, a 41-27 hole with 7:41 remaining before the intermission.

But then they scraped back into it, with Clark serving as the biggest catalyst.

In the first half, he scored 17 points on 6 for 8 shooting from the field and hit three 3-pointers, as his struggles from deep have been well-publicized over the past few months.

With Clark pushing the Dukes, they were able to fight back into it and tie the score at 49-49 at halftime.


Colin Dunlap: cdunlap@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1459.


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