If you go: Greene County foliage visit

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Maps:

A fairly detailed road map of Greene County can be found at: www.co.greene.pa.us/secured/gc/services/GCmap.htm You can also pick up an even more detailed map from the county's tourism bureau.

Call: 724-627-8687 (TOUR)

E-mail: tourism@co.greene.pa.us.

Directions from Pittsburgh:

Take I-79 south, but instead of getting off at the Waynesburg exit, try a more "scenic" approach: Take the Ruff Creek exit and follow 19 south into Waynesburg, past the university of the same name. Along the way, stop at Little Greene Apples, where you can buy fruit or antiques.

Foliage loop (see graphic):

From Waynesburg, head west along routes 18 and 21, which run concurrently through Rogersville. Stay on Route 21, past the Scott covered bridge, Graysville, Wind Ridge and, then, just past Ryerson Station, turn left on Aleppo Road and follow it south before turning left again on Route 18 and heading north back to Rogersville and east to Waynesburg.

Another colorful drive: After Rogersville, head south on Route 18. At White Cottage, turn left onto Tunnel Road, make a right onto Grinnage Run and veer left onto Warrior Road, which then turns into Bluff Ridge, going east. Follow that until Route 218, where you turn left, and follow it north into Waynesburg.

Two destination drives in eastern Greene County:

n Greensboro has an enchanting bookstore, Riverrun Books and Prints. It's located, almost literally, at the end of the road -- at the river landing where Greensboro's main street ends and the Mon River begins. In the mid-19th century, Greensboro was once something of a boom town, known for its salt-glazed stoneware pottery, which is no longer made but can still be found on the Internet or antique stores for hundreds or thousands of dollars.

At Riverrun Books, there's a "judicious selection" of used, rare and out-of-print titles. Its owner, Robert Richards -- who once owned two bookstores in Pittsburgh -- set up shop in Greensboro 25 years ago with his artist wife, Maggy Aston, in a 1874 house once owned by a prominent pottery manufacturer. It is floor-to-ceiling books, more than 25,000 titles, from "Light in August" to "20th Century Verse From Lichtenstein" to "Whaling and Old Salem." (Mr. Richards' great-great-grandfather was a whaleman and a sea captain for 50 years out of Sag Harbor, N.Y.)

The hours are by chance or appointment, so it's a good idea to call ahead. There's also a B&B across the street, and a modest family restaurant, the Ice Plant, on the town's outskirts.

Riverrun Books and Prints

1874 County St.

Greensboro, PA 15338

724-943-4944

You can order Mr. Richards' books on the Internet at www.abebooks.com/home/RIVERBKS/.

Rices Landing on the Mon River is a historic river town where, a century ago, steamboats once stopped for repairs at the W.A. Young & Sons Foundry and Machine Shop, which produced everything from mousetraps to horseshoes to locomotive wheels until it closed in 1965. Rather than sell off the equipment, the foundry's owners left everything untouched, prompting a Smithsonian Institution curator to pronounce it "the greatest find of its type in the nation." Today it's listed on the National Register of Historic Places and undergoing restoration by the Greene County Historical Society.

Off the beaten path:

The Ned Store:

From Waynesburg, head south on Route 18 to Garrison, to the J & K general store. Turn right and follow Garrison Ridge Road west -- and here the road narrows to one lane at some points -- until you reach the tiny village of Ned, and, on the left, the Ned general store, a small brown stone building of no particular glamour. But walk into its dark interior, complete with original wood floor and pressed tin ceiling, and amid the shelves of Campbell's soup, Tylenol and tire chains, you will be transported into the past.

Useful links:

Greene County Tourism:

www.greenecountytourism.org/index.html.

Greene County Historical Society:

www.greenecountyhistory.com



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