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Robert Burns Supper held at Pittsburgh Golf Club


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The Scottish poet Robert Burns may be long gone, but his birthday is an annual celebration among the tartan set. So with nary a thought to swirling snow, many a man donned a kilt and headed to the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh's first Robert Burns Supper at the Pittsburgh Golf Club Saturday night. It was splendid to see so many people in plaid as they perused the silent auction and enjoyed a wee dram at the Scotch table, all while the Macdonald Pipe Band played. As is the tradition, guests were piped into dinner and the haggis was carried in with great pomp and more piping. Emcee Gordon MacDonald Reid read "Address to the Haggis" by Robert Burns after which everyone raised a glass and shouted, "Haggis!" Only a taste was served -- the main course was Jamison Farm lamb, taters and neeps.

Event co-chair Vaughan Blaxter welcomed everyone and introduced Frank Connelly, who flew in from Scotland. Mr. Connelly is the director of Dynamic Dunfermline, which promotes the history of the town that is Andrew Carnegie's birthplace. To end the dinner everyone stood and sang "Auld Lang Syne." If you weren't Scottish when you walked in you were when you left. Among the lads and lassies up for a fling were co-chair Bonnie Blaxter, Ann and Marty McGuinn, Sara Horsman with Clarence Klaus, Doug Berryman and Karen Loysen, Meg and George Cheever, Dolly and Curt Ellenberg, Dolores and Martin Schultz, Steve and Peggy McKnight, Barbara Tucker, Alice Snyder, Carol Caroselli and PG publisher John Block with Susan.


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