Color, creativity run riot at contemporary furniture fair


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NEW YORK -- From a giant vertebra lamp to lights that look like cotton balls, the cornucopia of creativity was overflowing during the International Contemporary Furniture Fair's 25th anniversary show and Design Week in New York City this spring.

DFC's Castigliosaurus floor lamp resembling a dinosaur's spine had people doing double takes. Created in 2013 by Mauricio Paniagua and Tony Moxham, the name is a nod not only to prehistoric thunder lizards but also to Castiglioni's iconic floor lamp. The lamp is made entirely in Mexico with hand-cast ceramic vertebrae, a metal inner spine and a base and shade hand-carved from locally sourced volcanic rock.

Off in a corner of the fair, a woman sat wrapped in fabic-covered tubes that turned out to be the Volcano chair by K.S. Design. It allows a variety of seating arrangements while wrapping you like a security blanket. K.S. Design also showed Bright Cotton, a glowing fixture that looks like a cotton ball, square or other shape.

Looking conventional in comparison was the Remix Rocker by Jonathan Kim for Bernhardt Design and Clo stools by Yeji Kim with soft fabric and hardwood.

A special exhibit, "Inside Norway" featured 21 young designers who displayed clocks, rugs, chairs, tables and finely sculpted decorative items. Stokkeaustad teamed with designer Andreas Engesvik of Oslo to create The Woods glass sculpture.

Vondom showed off many outdoor pieces, including Adan by Teresa Sapey -- sculpted resin heads that can be stools, tables or garden ornaments. Just as playful but for indoor storage were lockers that look like Amsterdam canal houses from Cool Kids Company.

Something both children and adults will love is the super comfortable modern hammock called Surf by Royal Botania. The Belgian company also showed off several sleek outdoor loungers, including the minimalist electro-polished steel NINIX and QT 125 stackable loungers from its Red Line Collection.

In lower Manhattan's Terminal building, Randall Buck and Jee Levin displayed their mural-style wall coverings for Trove. Called Redeux, the coverings contain more than 30 percent recycled materials and are mold- and mildew-resistant.

"It replaces artwork. It's decoration," said Mr. Buck.

For the industrialist, there was Colin Selig's seats made from repurposed propane tank seats. Also winning acclaim were leather-trimmed and -embellished wooden stools by Debra Floz, and Goma by designer Renata Moura, whose bright idea was to create illuminated pieces that are a side table and floor lamp in one.

Meanwhile, Sinje Ollen wasn't taking a back seat to anyone with her Crochet chair and rug, which have hidden zippers so you can rearrange the pattern.

Sources

www.royalbotania.com

www.kerenshikr.com

www.TotalDFC.com

www.InsideNorway.tumblr.com (Norwegian items)

www.troveline.com

www.yejikimdesign.com

www.coolkidscompany.com

www.vondom.com

www.debrafolz.com

www.renatamoura.com

www.sinjeollen.com

www.colinselig.com

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Patricia Sheridan: psheridan@post-gazette.com, 412-263-2613 or on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/pasheridan.


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