Kitchen Mailbox: Her fudge will have you hooked

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Karyn Kugler of Ashburn, Va., formerly of Whitehall. is a woman of varied talents. A graduate of the New Jersey Police Academy who worked as a police office in North Wildwood, Karyn in her free time designs and makes her own purses. She volunteers at an all breed no-kill dog rescue and makes dog leashes that glow in the dark. And she makes fudge -- really good fudge.

I've never been a fan of fudge but when I tasted hers I was hooked. When I made the first batch, I gave my husband a sample and he loved it -- and he's not too keen on any form of chocolate.

Karyn makes her fudge during the holidays and gives it to friends and family instead of Christmas cards. But the fudge is so darn good I thought, Why not make it for Valentine's Day?

A tip from Karyn: "The fudge can be kept at room temperature for the best flavor after the initial two to three hours of refrigeration. If you choose to keep it refrigerated longer, make sure it's well covered. The fudge dries out if refrigerated too long uncovered."



COOKIES-AND-CREAM FUDGE

PG tested

  • 3 6-ounce packages white chocolate baking squares (preferably Baker's Premium White)

  • 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk

  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

  • 3 cups (about 20 cookies) coarsely crushed chocolate cream-filled sandwich cookies

Line an 8-inch square pan with wax paper, extending paper over edges of pan.

Melt white chocolate squares with sweetened condensed milk and salt in heavy saucepan over low heat. Remove from heat; stir in crushed cookies. Spread evenly in prepared pan.

Chill 2 hours or until firm. Remove from pan by lifting edges of wax paper. Cut into squares.

Makes about 1 pound.



CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW SWIRL FUDGE

PG tested

  • 3 cups (18 ounces) semi-sweet chocolate chips

  • 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk

  • 4 tablespoons butter, divided

  • Dash salt

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 cups miniature marshmallows (Karyn uses pink peppermint-flavored)

Line an 8- or 9-inch square pan with wax paper, extending paper over edges of pan.

Combine chocolate chips, sweetened condensed milk, 2 tablespoons butter and salt in heavy saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until melted. Remove from heat. Stir in vanilla. Spread evenly in prepared pan.

Working quickly, melt marshmallows with 2 tablespoons butter in medium saucepan over low heat. Spread on top of chocolate layer. Swirl marshmallow into chocolate with knife or spatula.

Chill at least 2 hours or until firm. Remove from pan by lifting edges of wax paper. Cut into squares.

The amount of fudge will differ depending on the size of pan used.

-- Karyn Kugler



PEANUT BUTTER CHOCOLATE SWIRL FUDGE

PG tested

  • 2 cups (12 ounces) peanut butter chips

  • 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk, divided

  • 2 tablespoons butter

  • Dash salt

  • 1/4 cup semi-sweet or milk chocolate chips

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Line 8- or 9-inch square pan with wax paper, extending paper over edges of pan.

Melt peanut butter chips with 1 cup of the sweetened condensed milk, butter and salt in heavy saucepan over low heat; set aside.

In another sauce pan melt chocolate chips with remaining sweetened condensed milk (about 2 ounces) in small saucepan. Remove from heat; add vanilla. Stir until smooth.

Spread peanut butter mixture evenly into prepared pan. Spoon chocolate mixture over peanut butter mixture. Using a knife or metal spatula, swirl through top of fudge.

Chill 3 hours or until firm. Remove from pan by lifting edges of wax paper. Cut into squares.

The amount of fudge will differ depending on the size of pan used.

-- Karyn Kugler

food - recipes - kitchenmailbox

To request a recipe or send a recipe or question to Kitchen Mailbox, write the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, c/o Arlene Burnett, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 or aburnett@post-gazette.com.


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