Centenarian Emma Hughes credits God for long life


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Emma Hughes believes that turning 100 years old is a gift from God:

"What did I do to earn that kind of gift?" she wonders. "I ask God to look beyond my faults and see my needs. Whatever you want and need, trust in God and He'll get it."

She was born on March 2, 1913, in Junction City, Ga. Her parents, Henry and Mary Stedman, couldn't spare her to attend school. Instead, she worked on a farm to help support her family, earning about 50 cents a day. Later, she got a job cooking and helping with the children for the Cummings family, earning about $3.50 a week. She is still in contact with members of the family.

She married Richie Hughes and they settled in Ellaville, Ga. They had four children and many grandchildren. Some of her children moved to Western Pennsylvania, and after her husband died she joined them. She has lived in the area for 40 years and now lives at ManorCare Health Services in Ross, where she celebrated with cake and ice cream on her birthday.

She spends her leisure time piecing and quilting, a lifelong hobby she still enjoys. Mrs. Hughes shared a few lessons that come with 100 years of life:

"I learned to work for what you want, and to save. And one thing I learned is to try to live and get along with people in God's world. I've learned in God."

birthdays

If you or a friend or a relative recently turned 100 or will soon do so, the Post-Gazette would like to hear from you. To be included in Century Club, send the honoree's biographical information and your phone number to Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Century Club, Attn: Kevin Kirkland, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh 15222. Fax: 412-491-8452. E-mail: kkirkland@post-gazette.com.


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