Unsafe city driving

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Our city is unsafe with the unlawful driving practices of Pittsburgh motorists. The speed limit, turn signals and yielding to pedestrians aren't suggestions.

My gripe with rolling through stop signs and running red lights is that I always hear motorists saying that cyclists don't stop for these, while they themselves aren't doing it either. Motorists forget that the speed limit is called such because it's a maximum -- meaning, "Driving 1 mph above this? You're breaking the law, and should be ticketed." Pittsburgh has narrow streets, and more than 10 mph on some of them is downright reckless. On top of speeding, too many drivers are distracted. While waiting for the bus, I count how many drivers are also texting or talking on their phones.

Road rage is another danger presented by motorists. I'll see people driving the speed limit, and there'll almost always be an angry, impatient driver behind them revving their engine, tailgating, honking ... I don't feel safe while people who are this angry that they're 45 seconds behind are on the road. Police need to be vigilant in their ticketing. If people get ticketed for driving 5 mph over the speed limit, they might get the hint that their behavior isn't safe and can kill someone.

Automobiles are heavy machinery. They must be operated with extreme caution, especially since they can kill a person with minimal force. It should be more difficult to obtain and keep your license. You should be retested every time you renew your license, because new traffic laws are passed all the time. I wish there were a three strikes deal for road rage. Involved in three road rage incidents? Either pass an anger management course, or never drive again.

Driving isn't a right. It's a privilege that you earn and that can be revoked any time.

ERICA PETERS
Bloomfield


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