We need a financial president for a financial era

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The decision on voting for president of the United States should be based on which candidate is best for protecting the economic future of average Americans.

In making that decision, voters should concentrate on the unprecedented financial dangers we are facing -- the reality that the country is in a minefield where so many different things could go wrong and blow up the economy.

Among these threats are: the break-up of the eurozone, which would adversely impact the world banking system; the out-of-control budget and trade deficits which undermine the value of the dollar; the chance that bond markets will suddenly no longer be willing to buy American debt at favorable interest rates; and, finally, the chance that all the deficits and other economic problems and the likely rise of China as the world's largest economy will mean the American dollar will lose its status as the premier reserve currency in the world.

If any of these things happen, the impact to the American economy and living standard would make what occurred after Lehman Brothers failed in 2008 seem pale by comparison.

The reality is that the possibility of national economic calamity has never been higher and the number of different causes that could make it happen has never been greater. Clearly, this is a financial era and therefore we need a financial president.

In Mitt Romney, we have the person with the greatest financial acumen who has run for president in our lifetime. He is a person who has the best chance of keeping the U.S. from exploding in another Wall Street/banking-system crisis and who has the best chance of handling the aftermath should another one hit.

He should be elected president on Tuesday.

In Barack Obama, the incumbent president, we have a person who is well-meaning and sincerely cares, but who does not have the understanding or background to avoid or deal with another big economic meltdown; indeed, in another crisis similar to four years ago, he likely would be as irrelevant and inconsequential as George W. Bush was in October 2008.

We've had two bad presidents in a row -- George W. Bush and Barack Obama. These 12 years have hurt America terribly. However, there is nothing wrong with the United States of America that wouldn't be cured by a president with more relevant skill sets to deal with our problems. The next president needs to be both a political leader and a financial and economic wizard.

Mr. Romney qualifies on both counts. He is a businessman with a sharp financial mind, a successful former governor and he knows how to create consensus out of chaos. Virtually everything Mr. Romney has touched in his career, whether it involved business management, economics, state budgeting or the Winter Olympics, has been a success. We should let him do the same for the United States of America.

The world economy and the American economy have never been more precarious. We have seen what's happened in Greece, Portugal, Ireland and Spain. With the dangers we are facing now, don't think the same couldn't happen here.

In that case would you want a community organizer from the south side of Chicago or one of the most economically and politically capable individuals of this era?

If Mr. Obama is re-elected, there is no reason that the next four years will be any better. That alone is a good enough reason to elect the challenger. The chance that something worse will happen makes the case for Mr. Romney compelling.

Mitt Romney can create a safe, strong, growing economy that benefits all Americans; he can bring this country back.

ALLAN BLOCK
Chairman
Block Communications Inc.
Toledo, Ohio


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