Big Ten has bigger goals

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>UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- The Big Ten will have 14 teams and Penn State will have another eastern mate, as the anticipated addition of Rutgers University became official Tuesday.

Aside from the obvious financial aspirations for the Big Ten and Rutgers, little else is clear. Rutgers officials said they did not know when they could enter the conference and would have to negotiate an exit from the Big East. Big Ten conference commissioner Jim Delany said the league athletic directors had not discussed how the divisions might look with 14 teams but said they would begin considering those options starting in 2013.

The Delany who spoke in Tuesday in New Jersey said many of the same things Delany did Monday in Maryland when announcing the University of Maryland's move to the Big Ten. He listed the same reasons: a paradigm shift in college athletics, considerations that began three years ago, academics.

He even offered up the same quote about eastern expansion, simply replacing the name of the state for his sound bite.

"We're not asking New Jersey to move to the Midwest," Delany said. "We're moving to the Northeast."

Of the possibility of introducing the Big Ten Network television to the New York/New Jersey market, he said that was a factor in adding Rutgers, but not the only one.

Penn State cornerback Stephon Morris, who is from Greenbelt, Md., said Tuesday that the addition of the new teams would benefit his home state and give the university some needed exposure.

"The Maryland program, you go to the state of Maryland and you don't even know it's there," he said.

Wide receiver Allen Robinson said players from New Jersey and Maryland (there are 21 of them on the roster) were looking forward to the prospect of playing games in those states.

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