U.S. astronauts with Western Pennsylvania connections

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• Edward Michael "Mike" Fincke, lieutenant colonel, U.S. Air Force mission specialist. He was born March 14, 1967, in Pittsburgh; calls Emsworth his hometown.

Education: B.S. in aeronautics and astronautics as well as earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master's degree in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University and a master's in planetary geology from the University of Houston, Clear Lake.

Time in space: More than 187 days. On June 24, 2004, the International Space Station crew was forced to abort a critical spacewalk when pressure in the oxygen supply began to drop too quickly due to a flaw in Col. Fincke's spacesuit.

• Stephen N. Frick, U.S. Navy commander, pilot. He was born Sept. 30, 1964, in Pittsburgh.

Education: B.S. in aerospace engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and a master's in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School.

Time in space: Pilot of shuttle Atlantis in November 1994 on the STS-110 mission to the International Space Station. More than 259 hours in space flight.

Former


• Jerome Apt, civilian. He was born April 28, 1949, in Springfield, Mass.; calls Pittsburgh his hometown.

Education: B.A. in physics from Harvard College; Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Time in space: Flew on STS-37, STS-47, STS-59 and STS-79, four space shuttle missions, from 1991 to 1996. More than 847 hours in space flight. More than 10 hours working outside the space vehicle (EVA, or extravehicular activity).

• Terry J. Hart, civilian. He was born Oct. 27, 1946, in Pittsburgh.

Education: B.S. from Lehigh University; master's in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; master's in electrical engineering from Rutgers University; honorary doctor of engineering from Lehigh University.

Time in space: Flew on STS 41-C; has more than 167 hours of flight.

• Edgar D. Mitchell, captain, U.S. Navy (retired). He was born Sept. 17, 1930, in Hereford, Texas.

Education: B.S. in industrial management from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University); B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; doctorate in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Time in space: Flew on Apollo 14. More than 216 hours of space flight; more than nine hours in extravehicular activity.

• Paul J. Weitz, captain, U.S. Navy (retired). He was born July 25, 1932, in Erie.

Education: B.S. in aeronautical engineering from Penn State University; master's in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School.

Time in space: Flew on Skylab 2 and STS-6. More than 793 hours in flight; more than two hours in EVA.

Deceased


• James B. Irwin, colonel, U.S. Air Force (retired). He was born March 17, 1930, in Pittsburgh. He died Aug. 8, 1991, of a heart attack.

Education: B.S. in naval science from the U.S. Naval Academy; master's in aeronautical engineering and instrumentation engineering from the University of Michigan.

Time in space: Flew on Apollo 15. More than 25 hours in flight; more than 19 hours in EVA.

• Judith A. Resnik, civilian. She was born April 5, 1949, in Akron, Ohio. Died Jan. 28, 1986, in the STS 51-L accident. All seven crew members of the shuttle Challenger were killed in the accident 73 seconds after liftoff.

Education: B.S. in electrical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University; Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland.

Time in space: Flew on STS 41-D. More than 144 hours in flight.

• Patricia Hilliard Robertson, civilian. She was born March 12, 1963, in Indiana, Pa. Homer City was her hometown. She died May 24, 2001, of injuries suffered in the crash of a private plane at Wolfe Air Park, Manvel, Texas.

Education: B.S. in biology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.D. from the Medical College of Pennsylvania.

Time in space: She was serving as a support astronaut for crew members on board the International Space Station. She was scheduled for a shuttle mission in 2002.



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