Unemployment up slightly in July as more look for work


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In a case of good news at first looking bad, the national unemployment rate rose slightly in July to 6.2 percent from 6.1 percent in June.

That increase, which is seasonally adjusted, was because the labor force grew by 329,000 people and the percentage of the population who are working or trying to get jobs is up.

The number of unemployed people grew by 197,000 so that in July there were 9.7 million people who were trying to find work, but did not have a job. A third of all unemployed workers have not worked more than six months.

The number of people who reported that they are working also grew, by 131,000.

Employers added 209,000 jobs in July, which was also seasonally adjusted.

Manufacturing grew by 30,000 jobs overall with 19,200 jobs building transportation equipment, 14,600 of those jobs were in the auto industry.

Large gains were seen in retail trade which added 26,700 jobs.

Health care added jobs with ambulatory care services up by 21,300 jobs.

Governments added jobs in July, nearly all of them working for municipalities which staff parks in the summer. Local governments, excluding the public schools, added 10,200 jobs in July. That may help explain why the number of teenagers who were working in July rose by 44,000.


Ann Belser: abelser@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1699 First Published August 1, 2014 12:00 AM

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