Obituary: Rose A. Strafalace Demma / Ran Brookline market with husband for more than 30 years

May 14, 1925 - March 16, 2013

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Rose A. Demma, who with her husband operated Demma's Market in Brookline for more than 30 years, died Saturday of congestive heart failure. She was 87.

One of nine children, the Millvale native met Leo Demma at West View Park Danceland and married him May 30, 1950. Several years later, they purchased an existing grocery store at 934 Brookline Blvd., where Mr. Demma had worked as a teenager. They changed the name to Demma's Market, which sold specialty meats, produce and groceries.

"She did the books and then she would wait on customers," said their son, Michael Demma of DuBois, Clearfield County.

He described the store as an old world market with sawdust on the floor. It was stocked with beef from cattle his father handpicked at a suburban Pittsburgh farm and fresh produce from the Strip District. The Demmas sold the business in 1985.

"They were always known for the finest, fresh-cut meat," said Frank DeBor, whose parents operated a funeral home near the store.

Mr. DeBor said Mrs. Demma "was a real right-hand man to her husband."

Michael Demma said his mother liked to do projects around the house, including painting and yardwork. She also liked bowling and golf, which she played with her husband at South Hills Country Club.

In addition to her husband and son, Mrs. Demma is survived by a sister, Clara Strafalace of Green Tree.

Friends may call today at Frank F. DeBor Funeral Home, 1065 Brookline Blvd., Brookline, from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m.

A Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Church of the Resurrection, 1100 Creedmor Ave., Brookline. Mrs. Demma will be buried in Mt. Lebanon Cemetery.

food - neigh_city - businessnews - neigh_south

Len Boselovic: lboselovic@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1941.


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