US employers add jobs, unemployment rate stays at 6.3 percent

US employers added 217K jobs in May, 4th month of solid gains; unemployment rate stays 6.3 pct

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National unemployment remained at 6.3 percent in May while the country added 217,000 new jobs, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this morning.

It was good news, considering that during the month the national labor force grew by 192,000 people, which included many of the students who graduated, either starting new jobs or looking for work. The figures are seasonally adjusted so that months may be compared to each other with seasonal hiring taken into account.

A survey of households determined that 145,000 more people were working in May than had been in April. The number of people who were unemployed also increased by 46,000.

Employers added 217,000 new jobs, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, according to a separate survey.

More than a quarter of those jobs were added in the health care and social assistance sectors. The industry category that includes doctors' offices, home health care services and outpatient care centers such as physical therapy centers accounted for 23,100 new jobs.

Leisure and hospitality companies added 39,000 jobs.

And though public schools across the country cut 6,600 jobs in May, municipalities and county governments picked up 18,000 employees, which is consistent with the start of summer seasonal employment.

Ann Belser: abelser@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1699.

 

 

United States - North America

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