Chevy’s Tahoe LT delivers improved ride, performance for 2015


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Redesigned inside and out for 2015, the Chevrolet Tahoe is just one of the reasons truck sales are so strong across the country. For the most part, Tahoe customers like the size and the interior room, but Chevrolet has also done a nice job of upgrading the mechanics, the structure and the luxurious appointments in the cabin. The navigation and all the in-cabin technology have also been escalated. As for the ride, for a frame up vehicle, it is absolutely phenomenal.

On the road, the new Tahoe feels more like a Buick sedan than a full-framed SUV, which in the past could be a little bumpy when traversing some of the country roads around Pittsburgh. A full-box frame supports payload and trailering capabilities, but also offers a premium ride thanks to an updated coil-over-shock independent front suspension design and five-link coil suspension design in the rear.

Despite its size, the Tahoe also displays excellent pick up and power even when climbing steep hills. Under the hood, a massive 5.3-liter V8 engine delivers all the power you could want. Mated to a six-speed automatic that shifted almost seamlessly, the drivetrain also offers a full locking rear differential for its four-wheel drive.

Behind the wheel, you sit in a heated, leather-appointed ten-way power adjustable seat with power recline and haptic seat alerts that rumble slightly to alert you if you come too close to the lane next to you without having your turn signal on—just one of the many standard safety features on the Tahoe.

The cabin is luxurious and well-appointed. Enhanced connectivity and convenience features for 2015 include OnStar with 4G LTE and standard built-in WiFi hotspot. The Tahoe also offers text message alerts for smartphone users with Bluetooth profile, which reads incoming texts through the Tahoe’s audio system. It also offers Siri Eyes Free for iPhone iOS 6 and iOS 7 users.

The Chevy Tahoe is offered in LS, LT and LTZ trims. It is a perfect ride for someone who is a little larger, but a full-sized SUV is not for everybody.

Due to its size, you’re not going to squeeze into any tight parking spaces. And since you’re riding so high in the saddle, the sight lines can take a little getting used to for a novice driver. This is especially true to the rear when the third row seat is up. The rear view camera eliminates this concern when backing out, however.

Getting in and out of the Tahoe could be a problem for older passengers, unless you spring for the passenger/driver assist running board option, which extends out to help with ingress and egress while folding back under when the vehicle is underway. However, if you have nimble children or teenagers, getting in and out of the third row seat is easier this year, thanks to Tahoe’s engineers who have moved the b-pillar slightly forward and made the c-pillar a little straighter.

The Tahoe can also be on the expensive side. The 2015 Tahoe LT driven for this review had a sticker of $60,855, which included a destination charge of $995 as well as a discount of $500 on a sun, entertainment and destinations package discount. This package is an excellent add-on that includes a power sunroof with a premium audio system, and eight-inch color touch screen with navigation.

Those small faults of any full-sized SUV aside, the new Tahoe is a marvel of technological accomplishment. Chevrolet engineers should be applauded for what they have brought to market.

For those in the market for a full-sized SUV and all that it offers, the new Chevrolet Tahoe is an absolute must drive. It offers all the performance you would expect from a full-sized SUV with luxurious appointments you would expect from an upscale sedan.


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