Media briefs: Australia radio group loses millions over prank

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A radio show prank that led to the suicide of a nurse in London last year reportedly cost its owner $7.4 million U.S. in lost advertising revenue.

The newspaper The Australian reports the loss was incurred by radio group owner Southern Cross Austereo. During a broadcast, disc jockeys Mel Greig and Michael Christian of 2Day FM in Sydney -- who claim they were encouraged by higher-ups at the station -- phoned the British hospital where the Duchess of Cambridge, the former Kate Middleton, was admitted for nausea early in her pregnancy.

Pretending to be members of the royal family, they were able to reach one of her nurses, who divulged private information. One of the nurses involved, Jacintha Saldanha, hanged herself shortly after discovering she'd been pranked.

As recently as last month, Australian authorities reportedly were still considering a criminal investigation over the illegal recording and broadcast.

'Chronicle' goes to Point State Park

WTAE-TV's second edition of "Chronicle" gets right to the Point.

"A Point of Pride" is part of the television station's occasional series of hourlong news programs. It airs Wednesday at 8 p.m. in place of reruns of ABC comedies "The Middle" and "Last Man Standing."

The show focuses on the landmark Point State Park and its centerpiece, the fountain.

"We are not just making another documentary about a famous place in Pittsburgh," said "Chronicle" host Sally Wiggin.

The fountain was dry for four years and is now up and running. The show opens with Gov. Tom Corbett at the reopening ceremonies at the Point, where high winds and a miscalculation of water pressure combined to douse members of River City Brass.

"A Point of Pride" also looks at the history of what became the city's signature park.

tvradio

Maria Sciullo: msciullo@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1478 or @MariaSciulloPG.


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