Hot List of activities for the coming weekend


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ALL WEEKEND

Point Park dance

For two weekends, the Point Park Conservatory Dance Company will present its annual “Contemporary Choreographers” program featuring works by some of today’s top artists.

This year, dancers will perform choreography by Pittsburgh native and 2013 MacArthur Fellow Kyle Abraham, three-time Ruth Page Award for Outstanding Choreography winner Randy Duncan, Brian Enos and Hubbard Street 2 director Terence Marling.

Times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Nov. 24 at the GRW Performance Studio at Point Park University, Downtown. Tickets are $18-$20, $7-$8 for students and $9-$10 for seniors (65 or older) at 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com.

FRIDAY

Music mix

Memphis alt-country band Lucero is out on the road with the new album “Texas & Tennessee,” playing a show with rowdy Jersey rockers Titus Andronicus at Mr. Smalls Friday. Singer Ben Nichols, who’s fronted Lucero since 1998, told Brooklyn Vegan, that on the latest album, “[We] just kind of wanted to dial it back a notch and have maybe a little more down home feeling.” The show is 8 p.m. Tickets are $20; www.mrsmalls.com.

• Sebadoh, led by Dinosaur Jr. bassist Lou Barlow, is on the road with its first album in 14 years, “Defend Yourself.” The noisy indie-rock stalwarts, also featuring Jason Lowenstein and Fiery Furnaces drummer Bob D’Amico, play a sold-out show at Club Cafe at 9 p.m. Friday with Octa#Grape.

• Pat Benatar, a real tough cookie with a long history, plays the Palace Theatre at 8 p.m. Friday with her husband, Neil Giraldo. Ms. Benatar was one of the biggest stars of the ’80s, scoring such hits as “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” “Love Is a Battlefield,” “Heartbreaker” and “We Belong.” Tickets are $49-$75; www.ticketfly.com.

• Future Islands makes its Andy Warhol Museum debut at 8 p.m. Friday as part of the museum’s Sound Series. NPR called the Baltimore trio’s sound as “texturally interesting as it is rhythmically accessible — music designed for both heads and feet.” Tickets are $15; $12 members and students; www.warhol.org or 412-237-8300. Free parking in the Warhol lot.

SATURDAY

Beatle night

AcoustiCafe presents the fifth annual Beatles tribute “With a Little Help From My Friends” 7 p.m. Saturday at Mr. Smalls in Millvale.

Jason Kendall hosts performances by Boulevard of the Allies, Maddie Georgi, Josh & Gab, Mark Dignam, Broken Fences, The Ruckus Bros., Chet Vincent & Big Bend, Drowning Clowns, The Wreckids, Ben Alper and more.

Proceeds benefit The Autism Connection of Pittsburgh. Food donations collected at the door will benefit the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

Tickets are $15; www.mrsmalls.com.

Bluegrass Highway

Contemporary bluegrass band Blue Highway plays the Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday as part of the Calliope: The Pittsburgh Folk Music Society series.

In its 19-year history, the Tennessee quintet has released nine albums and earned two Grammy nominations and a Dove Award. Tickets are $39 (includes handling fee) and $20 (student rush w/ID) at 412-361-1915 and www.calliopehouse.org.

SUNDAY

Magic Hands

Hand Made Theatre arrives all the way from St. Petersburg, Russia, with “Made for Fun,” a unique show for the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater Family Series. The 10 members, who do not speak English, use choreography and clever lighting, focused on their hands and arms, to create the appearance of trains, sailboats, ticking clocks, flocks of birds and more.

The group performs at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Byham Theater before moving on to local schools. Go to pgharts.org/kids for details.

Classic connections

The Organ Artists Series of Pittsburgh will present organist Robert Nicholls at 4 p.m. at Calvary Episcopal Church, 315 Shady Ave., Shadyside. Mr. Nicholls is a composer and the music director at First Presbyterian Church in Evansville, Ind., and won first place at the 2012 American Guild of Organists National Competition in organ improvisation. He will play works by Bach, Delius, Howell, Martin and Preston, as well as improvisations. A reception will follow. Tickets are $5-$12; www.oas-series.com or 412-242-2787.

• Pittsburgh native Kimberly Kong will perform works by Chopin, Haydn, Liszt and Mendelssohn in a recital presented by the Steinway Society of Western Pennsylvania. Ms. Kong has soloed with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. The concert will be 3 p.m. Sunday at Kresge Recital Hall, Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. Tickets are $5-$15, available at the door. Information: www.sswpa.org.

NEED TO KNOW

• The Associated Artists of Pittsburgh hosts a group show opening party from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Framehouse Gallery at the Icehouse, 100 43rd St., unit 107, courtyard entrance, Lawrenceville. Jurors Kathleen Miclot and Liz Reed selected small works by 43 member artists. Info: 412-586-4559 or www.framehouseonline.com.

• Horror Realm, home of the semi-annual horror conventions, sets up shop at the Hollywood Theater in Dormont Saturday with a treat for fans of Troma Entertainment, the studio best known for the B-movie classic “The Toxic Avenger.” The triple feature includes “Mother’s Day” (5 p.m.), “Class of Nuke ’Em High” (7 p.m.) and its sequel “Return to Nuke ’Em High: Vol. 1.” Tickets are $15 or $7 per film; www.showclix.com/event/3787229.

• The Otets Paissii Performing Ensemble Bulgarian folk dance group presents its fall concert at the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead in Munhall at 7 p.m. Saturday. The theme is “Na Megdana” (“On the Village Square”). Following the concert, the Bulgarian Center is hosting a Vecherinka dance party at 9 p.m. with live Balkan music. Call 412-461-6188 for reservations.

• Dance majors from La Roche College will partner with Bodiography Contemporary Ballet for an evening of fresh works and live music. The program will include Bodiography artistic director Maria Caruso’s recent piece “Lux Aeterna” with accompaniment by the Westmoreland Choral Society and a solo to Nancy Galbraith’s “Ave Maria.” It’s 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Byham Theater, Downtown. Tickets: $30.75 (student and senior discounts); 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org.

• Ska-punk vets Reel Big Fish, always a blast at the Warped Tour, return to play a full set at Altar Bar 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $25; www.thealtarbar.com.

• Country stud Trace Adkins plays his Christmas Show at the Palace Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $45.75 to $87.75; www.thepalacetheatre.org or 724-836-8000.

• Carol Lauk directs a cast of a dozen in “The Curious Savage” by John Patrick, the funny old chestnut in Little Lake Theatre’s season of comedies. The Savage in question is wealthy eccentric Ethel Savage (Charlotte Sonne), who has some surprises for her greedy adult children. Show times are 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday through Nov. 23. Tickets are $18 Thursday and $20 Friday and Saturday; www.littlelake.org or 724-745-6300.

• The Carnegie Mellon School of Drama goes old school with “You Can’t Take It With You,” opening at 8 tonight. Show times are 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays and 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays through Nov. 23 at the Philip Chosky Theater on the CMU campus, Oakland. Tickets: $17-$29; www.drama.cmu.edu or 412-268-2407.

• Pittsburgh CLO Academy students will perform Stephen Sondheim’s “Into the Woods” at the New Hazlett Theater, North Side, at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, directed by faculty members Justin Fortunato, Kiesha Lalama and Bob Neumeyer. Tickets are $20 or $10 for children under 12. A limited number of tickets are available at 412-281-2234.


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