Daft Punk, Lorde get lucky at 56th annual Grammys

At Grammys, Daft Punk walks away with album of year and record of year



Hit the thrift shop for that three-piece suit -- and maybe add robot helmets -- because disco is alive and well in 2014.

On Sunday night at the 56th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles, French house duo Daft Punk took home record of the year and best pop duo/group performance for "Get Lucky," a song that parties like 1977.

The robot duo also won album of the year, best dance/electronica album and best engineered album for "Random Access Memories."

Pharrell Williams, the producer of the year winner in part for his work on the album, accompanied helmeted Daft Punk members Guy-Manuel and Thomas Bangalter, who sported both black and white formal wear.

"Well," the producer said for his silent collaborators on the second trip. "I suppose the robots would like to thank ... I bet France is really proud of these guys right now."

The team of Macklemore & Ryan Lewis rode songs about Goodwill shopping and gay rights to Grammy glory.

The rags-to-riches hip-hop duo from Seattle, which broke out last year with the chart-topping hit "Thrift Shop" and followed it with gay/lesbian marriage plea "Same Love," won four Grammys.

The duo won best rap album for "The Heist" (in the latest slight to Kanye West), best rap performance and best rap song for "Thrift Shop" and best new artist.

Macklemore, whose real name is Ben Haggerty, is on the old side to win a best new artist Grammy, at 30, and he's been around the block having released his first EP in 2000. He noted that he and producer Lewis made the album without a record deal and said, "Before there was any media, before there was any buzz, before there was a story, there was our fans. Without them, there would be no us."

In the breakout hit "Royals," Lorde sings of a life of "luxe," asking "Let me live that fantasy." It was all real for the New Zealand teenager Sunday as she took home two awards for that smash hit -- song of the year (the songwriter's award) and best pop solo performance.

Lorde -- real name Ella Maria Lani Yelich-O'Connor -- hit No. 1 last year with "Royals," the song from her debut album, "Pure Heroine," that hit home with young pop fans jaded by the lavish party life of stars, particularly rappers.

"This is the one thing I did not expect the most about tonight," she said, holding the Grammy on her first trip to the stage.

Jay Z, who had a leading nine nominations, won for best rap/sung collaboration with Justin Timberlake for "Holy Grail," sending Pittsburgh rapper Wiz Khalifa home empty handed once again.

The rap kingpin, who also won for his part in the "Suit and Tie" video with Justin Timberlake, thanked God for delivering him Beyonce and held up his Grammy, saying, "I wanna tell Blue that, 'Look, dad got a gold sippy cup for you."

Newcomer Kacey Musgraves, bringing a trailer park kind of realism to the Nashville scene with her major label debut, won best country album over Taylor Swift, Tim McGraw and others for "Same Trailer, Different Park" and best country song for "Merry Go 'Round." "I'll never get tired of playing that song," she said. "It's so special."

Pittsburgh native and CAPA high school grad Billy Porter was part of the team winning best musical theater album for "Kinky Boots," also a multiple Tony winner. Mr. Porter was not there to receive the preshow award, but tweeted "I got a Grammy Y'all. God is good!!"

It took more than 40 years, but Led Zeppelin finally won an actual Grammy to go with its Lifetime Achievement Award. The Hall of Fame band took best rock album for "Celebration Day," the live document of its 2007 reunion at the O2 Arena in London. Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul apparently had something better to do than show up in LA to accept.

Zeppelin, nominated for best rock performance along with David Bowie, fell to Imagine Dragons for "Radioactive."

Black Sabbath won its second-ever Grammy, best metal album for "God is Dead?" and was a no-show in the pre-telecast, depriving the millions of viewers at home from seeing Ozzy Osbourne get up and accept an award.

The metal gods had to stay in their seats for the prime-time show watching best rock song award go to Paul McCartney and the surviving Nirvana members. Drummer Dave Grohl admitted "Cut Me Some Slack" was something they banged out in a few hours -- working on the film "Sound City," which also won best compilation soundtrack.

"We wouldn't be here if it weren't for Paul and for Ringo," Mr. Grohl said, with bassist Krist Novoselic adding, "and for Black Sabbath and the Rolling Stones," who were also nominated.

New York band Vampire Weekend, which has become accustomed to topping critics' lists, won its first Grammy, in two tries, for best alternative album for its third release, "Modern Vampires in the City."

Once again, best reggae album went to a Marley, with Bob's son Ziggy winning for the live album "Ziggy Marley in Concert." It's his fifth, continuing the rough ride at the Grammys for perennial nominee Snoop Dogg who was up for his Snoop Lion reggae debut.

Adele, who was not on hand, maintained a streak of winning five straight years, earning best song written for visual media along with musical partner Paul Epworth for the James Bond theme "Skyfall."

Bruno Mars, who was shut out in the top categories, won pop vocal album for his second album, "Unorthodox Jukebox."

Young swing sultan Michael Buble became a four-time Grammy winner, taking pop traditional album for his eighth release, "To Be Loved." That meant Tony Bennett did not pull off the unprecedented feat of winning Grammys over a 51-year span.


Scott Mervis: smervis@post-gazette.com; 412-263-2576. Twitter: @scottmervis_pg

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