Concert preview: Stephen Stills rides into town

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Stephen Stills, already in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Buffalo Springfield and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, is running now with a new band called The Rides, which plays the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead tonight.

It finds the rock legend digging into his blues roots with relative young gun Kenny Wayne Shepherd and keyboardist Barry Goldberg (best known for Electric Flag with Michael Bloomfield and Buddy Miles). Joined by drummer Chris Layton (Double Trouble) and bassist Kevin McCormick (CSN, Jackson Browne) and working with producer Jerry Harrison (Talking Heads), The Rides spent a week in LA banging out a hard-edged blues-rock album called "Can't Get Enough."

The Rides

With: Beth Hart.

Where: Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, Munhall.

When: 8 tonight.

Tickets: $55, $75 and $95; LibraryMusicHall.com or 412-368-5225.

The guitar heroes split the vocals on four new co-writes, traditional blues covers, their own takes on Neil Young's "Rockin' in the Free World" and The Stooges' "Search and Destroy" and two old Stills gems -- the previously unrecorded "Can't Get Enough of Your Love" and an electrified version of "Word Game" from his 1971 debut.

"In the spirit of that simple, raw authentic '40s and '50s blues music the three of us love, we got in there and boom! A few takes and we were done," Mr. Stills said in a statement. "The songs have muscle, they don't sound dated or contrived, they're very natural and organic."

Graham Nash, who plays a solo show at the Music Hall in Munhall on Saturday, says of his longtime partner's project, "[Stephen] really is a great blues player, and he gets to express a side of his creativity that is different than when CSN go out."

music

Scott Mervis: smervis@post-gazette.com or 412-263-2675.


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