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Spacepimps unleash 'Eternal Boy'

• Just over three years after the release of their well-received sophomore album, "Stuck Here Forever," Pittsburgh-based pop-punk group The Spacepimps are set to deliver a new full-length album, "Eternal Boy," Tuesday.

"It really captures the innocence of our youth and how that mentality does not need to go away with age," said vocalist/guitarist Rishi Bahl, a Pitt grad, highlighting one of the problems facing aging punk rockers. Groups such as Green Day, however, have proven that this is not always the case, as the maturity that often comes with age can be used to propel bands forward.

"I think the theme for this album is to replace the cultural inclination of 'moving on' or 'growing up' with a celebration of the past in order to fully understand who someone is," said Mr. Bahl.

For The Spacepimps, the past has been full of tours across the U.S. and overseas, playing alongside New Found Glory, The Starting Line and All Time Low, and in Japan where they attracted a newfound fan base.

"Sometimes it's hard, and sometimes money is tight, but you can't take yourself too seriously. You need to run it like a business and be economical, but you can't take yourself too seriously or you're gonna break up," said Mr. Bahl. He then jokingly added that one of the big indicators of a successful tour is making it through spending nearly every waking second with your bandmates without killing them.

The band may have grown up and discovered success, but it has still managed to maintain its Pittsburgh roots, both in music and attitude. "Our work ethic is more indicative of Pittsburgh," said Mr. Bahl, who referenced the group's DIY mentality, "the blue-collar aspect of just putting your head down and just doing work."

So far, the only glimpses of The Spacepimps' future have been two singles: "Brand New Me!" and "Party Foul," both of which can be found on the band's website at www.thespacepimps.net.

" 'Eternal Boy' is this concept that we don't want to forget the past, we want to celebrate it. As time progresses, it becomes easier to look back and reflect," said Mr. Bahl. "It's much more about the process of growing up rather than the act of growing up.

The Spacepimps will hold an album release show for "Eternal Boy" on Aug. 3 at Altar Bar, Strip.

-- Andrew Gretchko, Post-Gazette

Mac Miller hits No. 3

• To no one's surprise, Mac Miller did not repeat his chart-topping performance on the same week that Kanye West dropped "Yeezus" and J. Cole "Born Sinner."

Kanye hit No. 1 with 328,800 (his sixth chart-topping album but lowest debut yet), Cole was a close second at 297,922 and Miller was third at 101,795 (down from "Blue Slide Park's" chart-topping 145k).

Miller, under his singing alter-ego Larry Fisherman, tweeted, "I did 100k by just making some cool music that everyone can vibe to. The revolution is here."

As for the critical numbers, Kanye also earned the highest Metacritic score with an 85 (out of 100), followed by Miller at 75 and Cole at 73.

Miller's Space Migration Tour is in Texas this week and on its way to Stage AE on July 12.

Heavy rock split

• Fans of classic rock -- the hard and psychedelic variety -- are directed to a new split 12" EP from Pittsburgh bands Outsideinside and Old Head.

Outsideinside features the rhythm section of Jim Wilson and Panfilo DiCenzo backing Carousel singer Dave Wheeler on a few heavy blues-rock grinds ("Dreamless," "Misled") that will fit well on your Blue Cheer/Mountain playlist.

Old Head finds Modey Lemon members Phil Boyd and Jason Kirker with Mike Layton and Bill Wehmann (Frizz) on a pair of menacing psych-rock songs, "Riding a Machine" and "Zama," that owe as much to early Sub Pop as the late '60s.

The release show is at the Brillobox, Bloomfield, at 10 p.m. Saturday.

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