PEOPLE: Stephen A. Smith, Andi Dorfman, Christian Rudder, Rob Lowe and more!

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Stephen A. Smith has been suspended from “First Take” following his comments made last week about NFL player Ray Rice’s suspension over domestic violence, ESPN said on Tuesday, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

“ESPN announced [Tuesday] that Stephen A. Smith will not appear on ‘First Take’ or ESPN Radio for the next week. He will return to ESPN next Wednesday,” said the network in a statement posted on its “First Take” website.

Smith had apologized for the remarks on Monday, saying that it was “the most egregious error of my career.”

When Andi Dorfman signed up to be “The Bachelorette” this season, she was hoping to find her “great love” among a field of 25 potential suitors.

The Atlanta native, 27, found her partner for life in former pro baseball player Josh Murray, 29, whom she warily called “her type” all season long, People reports.

Before accepting a stunning Neil Lane ring from Murray in the Dominican Republic, the former assistant district attorney sent home Nick Viall, 33, during a tense conversation in which the sales account executive told Dorfman she had taken it “too far” with him.

But once she made her way to Murray, Dorfman couldn’t contain her happiness.

“When I decided to give up my first love — baseball — all those years ago, a big reason why was because I knew there was a great love that existed somewhere,” Murray told her.

“You are the answer to all my prayers. You are the woman of my dreams. You are the woman that I never thought existed in this world. I know deep down in my heart I am the only man who can make you smile the way you do.”

In true “Bachelorette” fashion, Dorfman kept Murray on his toes until the very last second, telling him, “It has been a struggle for me, a challenge … and the truth is that … from the first time I met you, I was scared.”

With her future fiance looking increasingly worried, Dorfman continued after a dramatic pause, saying, “It has taken a lot of thought for me to get here and I know that that feeling from the very first time I saw you … I know that feeling right now, is love!”

Breaking out into a smile and looking relieved, Murray dropped down to one knee to ask for her hand in marriage, telling her he “can’t wait to start our lives together.”

As if dating wasn’t hard enough?

One of the founders of the dating site OkCupid, Christian Rudder, wrote a company blog post about how it has been secretly experimenting with its members in order to find the best ways to match people, E! News reports.

Sound familiar? Well, just last month Facebook revealed that it was playing around with its members' news feeds to see if it could affect people’s moods. As you can imagine, the reactions to both Facebook and OkCupid’s announcement were less than stellar.

“I’m the first to admit it: We might be popular, we might create a lot of great relationships, we might blah blah blah,” Rudder wrote. “But OkCupid doesn’t really know what it’s doing.”

He continued, “Most ideas are bad. Even good ideas could be better. Experiments are how you sort all this out. … We noticed that people didn’t like it when Facebook “experimented” with their news feed. Even the FTC is getting involved. But guess what, everybody: If you use the Internet, you’re the subject of hundreds of experiments at any given time, on every site. That’s how websites work.”

His letter outlined three main experiments that the company tested: Love is blind, or should be; so what’s a picture worth?; and the power of suggestion.

But before you go canceling your membership, keep in mind that the site claims the company is trying to perfect its matchmaking skills to ensure that you live out your happily ever after. Because at the end of the day, it’s not them … it’s you.

In the words of Rob Lowe: “If you like me and you like sharks, then you will probably like this” — and we’re happy to confirm that the studly actor is indeed correct, E! News reports.

The 2014 Shark Week promo has officially hit the Web, and if you have yet to watch the wild clip, then prepare yourselves for the ridiculousness that is about to ensue.

The video stars the erstwhile “Parks and Recreation” actor, who literally has nothing to do with Shark Week (or so we think) but still makes for a pretty handsome lifeguard as he rides atop two sharks while sporting a white tank top and red swim trunks.

To add to the cheesiness factor, the clip plays out in slow motion and sees Lowe cruising through the ocean with a beautiful blond mermaid by his side. He throws fish pieces into the air before a series of sharks — complete with some seriously corny special effects — fly over his head (and even knock a windsurfer off his board).

Lowe ends the clip by giving the camera a sexy stare before he proudly states, “so sharky” — instantly fueling the excitement for the upcoming week of sharktastic TV.

Dubbed the “King of Summer Since ’87” by Discovery cable network, Shark Week kicks off on Aug. 10.

Kyra Sedgwick is returning to the world of TV crime fighting. “The Closer” star will appear in multiple episodes of Fox’s “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” E! News has confirmed.

This is her first TV gig since “The Closer” ended in 2012.

Sedgwick won an Emmy and starred in that hit TNT drama as Brenda Leigh Johnson for seven seasons. In “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” she will play Madeline Wuntch, a long-time rival of Capt. Holt (Andre Braugher). The rivalry goes back to their early days in the NYPD. As she did in “The Closer,” Sedgwick will play a deputy chief in “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” She’s in a higher position than Holt and is hoping to take him down when she evaluates his precinct. Sedgwick is currently slated for two episodes.

Entertainment Weekly first reported Sedgwick’s casting.

Braugher recently was nominated for an Emmy for “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” The show and star Andy Samberg took home Golden Globes this year.

When we last saw Jake (Samberg) he was leaving to go undercover.

“The brash young Detective Peralta returns from his undercover duty hoping that the squad and everything will still remain the same, and in the course of his undercover work, the NYPD has gotten a new commissioner,” Braugher told E! News. “So things are radically changing and Holt is on the cutting edge of this. So the old, stodgy captain wants everything to change, and the young, brash detective wants everything to stay the same.”

“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” moves to Sundays at 8:30 p.m. and premieres Oct. 5 on Fox.

A Connecticut teacher who helped save students’ lives during the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre has a book deal, the Associated Press reports.

G.P. Putnam’s Sons announced Tuesday that “Choosing Hope: Moving Forward From Your Life’s Darkest Hour” by teacher Kaitlin Roig-DeBellis will be released next spring. The publisher says the book will be a “poignant account of personal triumph over unbearable tragedy.” Robin Gaby Fisher is co-writing it.

Roig-DeBellis hurried 15 first-graders into a bathroom upon hearing gunfire at the school in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 14, 2012, saving their lives. The gunman eventually shot himself to death after gunning down his mother, six teachers and 20 children.

Last year, Roig-DeBellis founded Classes 4 Classes, a nonprofit that advocates teaching children that all lives are connected.

Kiefer Sutherland’s rep late Monday responded to Freddie Prinze Jr.’s criticisms that Sutherland was “unprofessional” and height challenged when he worked with him on “24.” Prinze claimed the 5-feet-9 Sutherland was 5-feet-4, People reports.

“Kiefer worked with Freddie Prinze Jr. more than five years ago, and this is the first he has heard of Freddie’s grievances. Kiefer enjoyed working with Freddie and wishes him the best.”


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