PEOPLE: Sherri Shepherd, Carrie Preston, Billy Bob Thornton and more!

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One of Sherri Shepherd’‍s two custody battles is now over, People reports.

“The View“ co-host appeared in Los Angeles Superior Court on Monday for a hearing to determine if her ex-husband Jeffrey Tarpley’‍s petition for temporary physical custody of their son, Jeffrey, 9, would be approved or denied.

Judge Michelle Williams ruled against Tarpley’‍s request, citing that there has not been a material change in circumstances," according to court documents obtained by People.

In his declaration, filed on April 2, Tarpley claimed that Shepherd was neglecting their son through “poor parenting choices and refusal to provide for our child’‍s immediate needs.”

Tarpley cited Shepherd’‍s busy work schedule as the main reason for her alleged neglect, stating that her “career is seven days per week nonstop.”

“I stand behind my character and integrity,” Shepherd told People in June. “You can’‍t hold me down – I’‍m a wonderful mama."

In May, it was also revealed that Shepherd and estranged husband Lamar Sally had split, and that a custody battle was brewing over their unborn child via surrogate. That case remains unresolved.

Your favorite is coming back to “The Good Wife.” That’‍s right, Carrie Preston will soon return to the drama. CBS has confirmed the “True Blood” star will reprise her Emmy-winning role of Elsbeth Tascioni during the upcoming season six.

Preston took home the 2013 guest actress in a drama series Emmy for playing the kooky attorney. “That’‍s the most incredible role ever,” Preston said.

Taye Diggs is the only other announced “Good Wife” season six guest star so far.

Preston’‍s character is both a fan favorite and a favorite of the creators, Robert and Michelle King. There’‍s even been some chatter (mostly by fans) about spinning the character off.

“We’‍ve discussed it internally,” Robert King told E! News in April. “It always comes down to where you can put your energy. Our worry is that — we're not the kind of showrunners, unfortunately, who can take our eyes off this and do two things at once. I wish we could because there’‍s no one more fun to work with and better comedian than Carrie Preston. There’‍s such a cool show there.”

Season five of “The Good Wife” ended with Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) asking to join Florrick/Agos, the firm headed up by Alicia (Julianna Margulies) and Cary (Matt Czuchry). But then Eli Gold (Alan Cumming) asked Alicia to run for state’‍s attorney. So what happens next?

“The first episode takes another U-turn and you don’‍t see it coming,” Baranski told E! News. “It’‍s great. These writers are so skilled at coming at stories from an angle that you’‍re not anticipating and they’‍re really extraordinary writers.”

Last time Preston showed up on “The Good Wife“ she had a run-in with an anti-Semitic bear. How will “The Good Wife” top that this time?

Season six premieres Sept. 21 at 9 p.m. on CBS.

Billy Bob Thornton doesn’‍t watch Food Network’‍s “Cupcake Wars,” even though the popular program has been on for nine seasons. The reason, he said, is due to the unkind nature of reality competition shows, E! News reports.

“We’‍re living in a time that’‍s just become judgmental and everybody wants to see failure,” the 58-year-old actor said during an episode of “Oprah’‍s Master Class” that aired Sunday. The “Fargo” star continued, “They want to see people knocked off the hill. You can’‍t have a television show without a competition because they want to see who cries this week and who goes downhill, who gets kicked out.”

Thornton argued that reality TV is making society meaner.

“We don’‍t need one show about cupcakes, as far as I’‍m concerned, but you know what, if you want one —OK, that’‍s fine. Let’‍s have a show about cupcakes. But does it have to be a [expletive] competition? Do you have to have cupcake wars? You know?” he asked. “And I’‍m sure people who have been in war kind of take offense to that because, seriously, it's not that goddamn dangerous to make a cupcake.”

What does he hope will change? “I guess I’‍m just really ready for people to kind of settle down and know each other again and root for each other as opposed to look for the faults in each other,” he said.

According to Thornton, his desire to live in a kinder world inspires him to make “stories from another time and another place.” He added, “There's a lot of great stuff in life from the top to the bottom and from the left to the right. Life is magical, and I guess my thing is I wish that people wanted that magic.”

Beware of darkness … and also tree beetles.

Los Angeles Councilman Tom LaBonge told the Los Angeles Times that a pine tree planted near Griffith Park’‍s Observatory in 2004 to honor late Beatle George Harrison has died after an infestation of – wait for it – tree beetles, People reports.

As the paper notes, “Except for the loss of tree life, Harrison likely would have been amused at the irony.”

The Quiet Beatle was an avid fan of both comedy and plant life: He founded film production company HandMade Films just to produce ”Monty Python’‍s Life of Brian“ and spent much of his later years tending to the sprawling gardens of his mansion in England. (He also dedicated his autobiography, “I Me Mine,” to “gardeners everywhere.”)

The memorial tree had grown to more than 10 feet tall as of 2013, but the infestation proved too much. LaBonge said another tree will be planted in the original’‍s place.


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