PEOPLE: Harrison Ford, Jon Meis, Mekayla Diehl and more!

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Harrison Ford was rushed to hospital on Thursday after injuring himself on the set of the new “Star Wars” film, People reports.

Ford, 71, is reprising his iconic role as Han Solo in “Star Wars: Episode VII” and was injured while working.

“Harrison Ford sustained an ankle injury during filming today on the set of Star Wars: Episode VII," Disney confirmed to People in a statement. "He was taken to a local hospital and is receiving care. Shooting will continue as planned while recuperates.“

The injury occurred while shooting a scene aboard the Millennium Falcon, the spaceship his character pilots, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

J.J. Abrams is directing the eagerly anticipated ”Star Wars” reboot, which is set 30 years after the events of ”Return of the Jedi” and features original stars Ford, Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill, in addition to Lupita Nyong'o, Adam Driver, John Boyega and Daisy Ridley.

When the public caught wind of Seattle school shooting hero Jon Meis' June 21 wedding, the reaction was instantaneous, People reports.

Within 24 hours Meis and fiancee Kaylie Sparks' wedding registries at Target and Crate & Barrel had been fulfilled by strangers inspired by his courage, KIRO TV reports.

Still eager to reward the 22-year-old for his bravery, ESPN Seattle producer Jessamyn McIntyre created a GoFundMe site to help pay for their honeymoon and any other newlywed expenses.

The fund is now at more than $50,000, and a grateful Meis, who has declined media interviews but issued a statement earlier this week, has asked that future donations go to a fund for the shooting survivors.

“I am overwhelmed with the incredible generosity that has been showered upon me,” Meis said in the statement.

Meis, a senior at Seattle Pacific University, pepper-sprayed then disarmed and tackled gunman Aaron Ybarra, 26, after he killed one person and wounded two others in Seattle Pacific University's Otto Miller Hall on June 5.

Ybarra is being held without bail and has been charged with one count of murder and two of attempted murder.

One victim was released from the hospital over the weekend and is at home while the other remains in Harborview Medical Center for treatment, Tracey Norlen, SPU manager of public communications, tells People.

In true hero fashion, Meis denies that he is one.

“I know that I am being hailed as a hero,” he said, “and as many people have suggested I find this hard to accept.”

Nonetheless, he added, “It touches me truly and deeply to read online that parents are telling their children about me and telling them that real heroes do exist.”

While Miss Indiana Mekayla Diehl didn't win the highly coveted title of Miss USA, the brunette beauty certainly left a lasting impression on the audience, E! News reports.

The 25-year-old stunner was praised for her “normal” size-4 figure following the swimsuit competition on Sunday, and now the beauty queen is speaking out once again after becoming a role model for a healthy body image.

“I think the normality that everybody keeps talking about is just the fact that I’m relatable,” she explained in an interview with People. “I'm confident in my own skin. I didn't obsess over being too skinny or not being tall enough. I knew that I would be going up against some girls that were 6-foot-1 and professional models. That's them; I'm celebrating who I am."

According to the mag, Diehl maintained a high-protein, low-carb diet and exercised seven days a week prior to the competition with a goal of being strong and healthy — instead of focusing on the number on the scale.

”Before I started training for Miss Indiana USA, I weighed around 128 pounds,” she revealed. “Then I gained muscle mass and weighed around 135, 137 pounds when I left for Miss USA. I didn't really worry about my weight. It’s just a number.”

Diehl’s “just a number” mentality is part of what has earned her a loyal legion of fans, including Miss USA Nia Sanchez, who described the her as “fit, healthy and active.”

Despite her killer figure, Diehl was cut from the competition after she received too low of a swimsuit score and admits that the positive response on Twitter was just what the doctor ordered.

“For someone who had just been knocked out of the competition because her swimsuit scores weren’t high enough, it was a boost of confidence that I needed to enjoy the night,” she says of the overwhelmingly positive social media reaction.

The beauty queen, who previously called the response to her figure “so cool,” also confessed that being a positive role model is ultimately more important than the crown.

“If I'm inspiring, then in the end, I’ve won in more ways than I ever could have imagined.”

The Recording Academy has made a number of changes to its rules, most notably allowing samples to be used on songs nominated in all songwriting categories, including the all-genre song of the year, The Associated Press reports.

Previously, samples — snippets of previously recorded material or songs incorporated into a new work — had been allowed only in the Grammy Awards’ best rap song category.

The academy also reorganized the gospel and contemporary Christian category, formalized the definition for the alternative music field and added a category for best American roots performance. The addition means 83 awards will be given at the 2015 Grammys, and it brings the American roots music field into step with other major categories.

The changes, announced Thursday, were made at the academy’s recent spring board of trustees meeting.


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