People: Michelle Obama, Amy Adams, Samuel L. Jackson, Chris Kattan and more

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Justin Bieber’s bad behavior — including a recent DUI in Miami and drug use on a plane — has many wondering about what sort of parenting the 19-year-old has received, People reports.

Although he’s legally an adult, first lady Michelle Obama — who has called herself “Mom-in-Chief” — said the singer needs more guidance and attention, ABC News reports.

“I would pull him close. You know, I don’t know if it would be advice as much as action,” Obama said during an interview with Univision Radio host Enrique Santos. “I would be very present in his life right now. And I would be probably with him a good chunk of the time, just there to talk, to figure out what’s going on in his head, to figure out who’s in his life and who’s not.”

“I found that to be the case with my kids,” she said of her two daughters, Sasha, 12, and Malia, 15. “They just want you near, you know — they want that advice from a parent. They want to see you on a daily basis, because the thing is, he’s still a kid. He’s still growing up. So, I would pull him close.”

But many Americans want the opposite — to deport the Canadian pop singer and revoke his green card. A petition to do just that has garnered more than 250,000 signatures, requiring an official response from the Oval Office.

White House press secretary Jay Carney says an official response is forthcoming.

Talk about a fashion faux pas.

Amy Adams was just one of many celebrities who paid tribute to Philip Seymour Hoffman at the late actor’s funeral in New York City Friday. Hours after the “American Hustle” star attended the service, however, she was singled out in a press release for carrying one of Valentino’s luxury bags, E! News reports.

“We are pleased to announce Amy Adams carrying the Valentino Garavany [sic] Rockstud Duble [sic] bag from the Spring/Summer 2014 collection on Feb. 6 in New York,” Valentino rep Upasna Khosla wrote, according to The New York Post’s Page Six. Misspellings aside, the fashion label came under fire for using the somber outing as an opportunity to market one of its purses, which retails for $3,275.

Mona Swanson, vice president of communications for Valentino USA, issued a statement the next day in light of the company’s insensitive press release. “We sincerely regret releasing a photo to the media of Amy Adams with a Valentino Bag. We were not aware the photograph was taken while she was attending the wake of Philip Seymour Hoffman,” Swanson said. “It was an innocent mistake, and we apologize to Ms. Adams, who was not aware, or a part of, our P.R. efforts.”

Adams’ rep also clarified that the Oscar nominee, 39, “is not a paid spokesperson for Valentino, and the suggestion she would use this moment to participate in a promotion is truly appalling.”

Sam Rubin won’t be making that mistake again.

The entertainment reporter confused his guest, Samuel L. Jackson, with Laurence Fishburne during an interview Monday, and Jackson was not afraid to reprimand the KTLA anchor for his glaring mistake, People reports.

When asked if he got a reaction to his Super Bowl commercial, Jackson, who was on the show to promote his new film, “Robocop,” replied, “What Super Bowl commercial? You’re as crazy as the people on Twitter. I’m not Laurence Fishburne!”

When Rubin apologized and tried to move on, Jackson, 65, made it clear the reporter would not get off that easy.

“We don’t all look alike! We may be all black and famous, but we don’t all look alike! You’re the entertainment reporter for this station, and you don’t know the difference between me and Laurence Fishburne?”

Jackson then gave Rubin a quick who’s who lesson.

“I’m the other guy, ‘What’s in your wallet,’ I’m that guy. There’s more than one black guy doing a commercial. I’m the ‘what’s in your wallet black guy, he’s the car commercial black guy, Morgan Freeman is the other credit card black guy. You only hear his voice, though, so you probably won’t confuse him with Laurence Fishburne.

“And I’ve actually never done a McDonald’s or a Kentucky Fried Chicken commercial — I know that’s surprising,” Jackson added.

Rubin later apologized on air.

Authorities say former “Saturday Night Live” star Chris Kattan has been arrested on suspicion of drunken driving after his Mercedes struck a Department of Transportation vehicle on a Southern California freeway, People reports.

The California Highway Patrol says the Mercedes was seen weaving in and out of lanes shortly before 2 a.m. Monday on the 101 Freeway in Los Angeles.

The CHP says Kattan drove into a DOT vehicle that belonged to a crew conducting maintenance on a guardrail. No injuries are reported.

Kattan, 43, was jailed on suspicion of DUI.

Kattan, who was on “SNL” from 1996 to 2003, was best known for the character Mango. He also starred alongside Will Ferrell in the 1998 film “A Night at the Roxbury.”

A call to Kattan’s agent wasn’t immediately returned.

Some people really want to walk in Kanye West’s shoes. The rapper’s new collaboration with Nike — his Air 2 Red October sneakers — sold out in hours Sunday (no surprise), and they’ve already hit eBay (also, not surprising). But the current bidding price for Yeezy’s kicks did manage to surprise: roughly $16.4 million, People reports.

Nike announced on Twitter Sunday that the shoes were on sale, retailing for $245. And they sold out so quickly that the eBay sales started almost immediately. The sneakers are all red and feature gold embellishments on the laces (not real gold, although for the price people are willing to pay, you’d think it was).

The most ridiculous listing on eBay shows the top bid at more than $16 million, but more sales have been popping up with “Buy It Now” prices as low as about $5,748.


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here