People: Tom Hanks, Valerie Harper, Halle Berry, Jerry Siegel

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As Forrest Gump, Tom Hanks famously declared, "Life is like a box of chocolates." Only now it looks like he has to be extra-cautious about what sweets he pulls out of that box.

The affable two-time Oscar-winner, 57, revealed while appearing on "The Late Show with David Letterman" Monday night that he has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, although he called the condition "controllable," People reports.

"I went to the doctor, and he said, 'You know those high blood sugar numbers you've been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you've graduated! You've got Type 2 diabetes, young man,' " Hanks told Letterman.

Hanks stopped by the show to promote "Captain Phillips" and looked significantly slimmer than he appears in the film, in which he plays the heroic real-life ship captain who dealt with Somali pirates who invaded his vessel.

Letterman wasted no time in complimenting the grandfather. "You look wonderful, you look like a kid for God's sakes!"

"I'm maintaining the temple," Hanks replied in good humor before launching into the diagnosis and later downplaying its severity.

"It's controllable," he said. "Something's going to kill us all, Dave."

Letterman, 66, who underwent quintuple bypass surgery in 2000, also revealed that he too suffers from high blood sugar and also had to go on a special diet.

Hanks, who joins the ranks of celebrities including Paula Deen, Drew Carey and Randy Jackson who have made their Type 2 diabetes diagnoses public, also said that watching his weight is key to his health -- even if he can't entirely abide by his doctor's orders.

"My doctor said, 'Look, if you can weigh as much as you weighed in high school you will essentially be perfectly healthy and not have Type 2 diabetes.' And I said to her, 'Well, I'm going to have Type 2 diabetes,' " he said with a laugh.

"I weighed 96 pounds in high school," he explained. "I was a very skinny boy!"

Taylor Swift has set a record with the Nashville Songwriters Association International, The Associated Press reports.

The organization announced Tuesday that it would name Swift as its songwriter/artist of the year. This is her sixth win, beating out five-time winners Vince Gill and Alan Jackson.

The award recognizes Nashville acts that have achieved Top 30 singles. Swift has released 14 Top 30 songs from July 2012 through June 2013. She's also the youngest artist to win the honor.

Her six awards will be displayed at the Taylor Swift Education Center, which opens Saturday at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville. The 23-year-old singer donated $4 million to the center.

Valerie Harper continues to stay positive, People reports.

The actress, 74, who was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer earlier this year, is keeping her chin up, following Monday's early-season elimination on "Dancing With the Stars" with partner Tristan MacManus.

"I didn't know what it was going to be, but I came to it open-armed because I see the show and I see the joy on the show," Harper said backstage shortly after her dismissal. "And these wonderful dancers, week after week [are] breaking their whatevers to get a number [to] look right. They are great and I've enjoyed them very much. And then there's my fellow people [who] I enjoyed meeting."

And as she's been doing all along, Harper continues to keep a smile on her face when it comes to her outlook on life.

"We should live every day like it's our last," she said. "We're not promised next minute, next second. We're all terminal, folks. You heard it from me first. No, really, you've heard it from many wise people. That's a real live for the moment, be here now, don't waste your time [kind of motto]."

Added the former co-star of "The Mary Tyler Moore" show: "And my favorite [motto] that I invented, I think, is don't go to the funeral until the day of the funeral. Why are you fearing death before? You don't make it into a fetish of fear. You say, I don't know what's ahead, or let me do my best today. Let me do a favor. Let me forgive someone. Let me be grateful."

Continuing to reflect on her time on ABC's hit show, Harper said, "Let me say I'm so happy my knees are not broken. I'm going to go home and ice them and rest and I'm going to be fine."

Halle Berry and Olivier Martinez clearly feel blessed by their new baby boy.

The American actress and French actor, both 47, have named their son Maceo-Robert, a source close to the couple confirms to People.

The "Maceo" part is said to be of Spanish origin -- Martinez's father, Robert Martinez, was a Spanish boxer -- and means "gift of God."

The hyphenated name gives the boy one foot in the old world and one in the new -- perfect for the transatlantic couple, who "decided on a name that's great in both the U.S. and France," a source close to Martinez recently told People.

Berry, who won the Oscar in 2002 for Monster's Ball, also has a 5 1/2-year-old daughter, Nahla Ariela, from her previous relationship with Gabriel Aubry.

Ohio fans of the Man of Steel now officially can have the Superman logo on their wheels, the AP reports.

A license plate with the iconic "S" insignia went on sale Monday. It features the phrase "Truth, Justice and the American Way."

The Plain Dealer reports relatives of Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster were on hand for the plate's unveiling outside the Cleveland-area home where Siegel lived.

The plates cost $20, plus the standard registration fee of $34.50 or the typical $16.25 in fees to replace existing plates. Part of the fee goes to the Siegel and Shuster Society, which commemorates the men's work.

A letter by Siegel's daughter read at the unveiling says the men who created the comic superhero as teenagers in the 1930s would've been "absolutely thrilled" about the plates.

people

First Published October 8, 2013 8:00 PM


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