People: Kate Gosselin, Paula Deen, Lamar Odom, Donald Trump, Joey Crack

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Former reality TV star Kate Gosselin filed a lawsuit Monday accusing her ex-husband of stealing her hard drive and hacking into her phone and computer to get material for a tell-all book, The Associated Press reports.

Jon Gosselin accessed email, bank accounts and other private information for a book called "Kate Gosselin: How She Fooled the World," according to the federal lawsuit.

The 2012 book was written by Jon Gosselin's friend and business partner, tabloid writer Robert Hoffman, but pulled from the market after two days because the information had been illegally obtained, the lawsuit said.

"Jon violated a federal anti-hacking statute in order to publish salacious, scandalous and defamatory information about Kate," said her lawyer A. Jordan Rushie. "It's damaged her reputation."

The couple starred in the TLC show "Jon & Kate Plus 8," detailing life with their twins and sextuplets, before they separated in 2009 and later divorced.

She, a former nurse who now runs a coupon website, lives in Sinking Spring. He worked in information technology and now lives in nearby Wyomissing. Both are outside Reading, northwest of Philadelphia.

The lawsuit accuses Jon Gosselin of identity theft, wiretapping and invasion of privacy and seeks unspecified damages. A lawyer who once represented Jon Gosselin did not immediately return a message. Hoffman is also named as a defendant. He did not immediately return an email message sent through his website.


A federal judge signed off Monday on a deal to dismiss a discrimination lawsuit against celebrity cook Paula Deen, the AP reports.

A civil lawsuit accusing the former Food Network star and her brother of race discrimination and sexual harassment was officially dismissed when U.S. District Court Judge William T. Moore Jr. in Savannah approved a deal reached by attorneys in the case last week.

The order closed the case "with prejudice," meaning former Deen employee Lisa Jackson can't sue again over the same issues. Both sides agreed to pay their own court costs and legal fees. No other terms of the deal were disclosed.

Jackson sued last year, saying she worked in an environment rife with racial slurs and sexual innuendo during her five years as manager of Uncle Bubba's Seafood and Oyster House in Savannah. Deen co-owns the restaurant with her brother, Bubba Hiers, who oversees its daily operations.

The case got little attention outside Savannah until Deen herself was questioned under oath in a May legal deposition. A transcript filed with the court in June showed Deen acknowledged using racial slurs in the past. When an attorney asked if she had ever used the N-word, Deen replied: "Yes, of course." She also added, "It's been a very long time."

Within a few days, the Food Network said it would not renew Deen's contract and yanked her shows off the air. Smithfield Foods, the pork producer that paid Deen as a celebrity endorser, dropped her soon after. Retailers including Wal-Mart and Target said they would no longer sell Deen's products, and publisher Ballantine scuttled plans for her upcoming cookbook.

A deal to drop the case came less than two weeks after the judge dismissed the race discrimination claims by Jackson, who is white.

Deen said in a statement Friday that she looked forward to putting the case behind her but also planned to take a close look at the working environment at her businesses.


It was a rough weekend for Lamar Odom, People reports.

The Los Angeles Clippers basketball player and Khloe Kardashian Odom haven't been seen together publicly since June 2, amid multiple reports that he is battling drug addiction and his marriage is on the rocks.

"They really do love each other," a source tells People of the couple who wed in 2009. "But she really feels that this problem is out of control, and she's hurt that he won't get help." Kardashian Odom, 29, and her family attempted to stage an intervention last week, that resulted in Odom leaving their Tarzana, Calif., home, adds the source.

Odom, 32, has faced drug accusations before. In 2001, when playing for the Clippers, he violated NBA drug policies twice in eight months. Apologizing at a press conference he admitted to using marijuana and told reporters and fans, "I've made a couple [of mistakes] and I may make a couple again, but hopefully they won't be as big as this one."

Things seemed to be back on track last season. Back in Los Angeles, Odom played the season with the Clippers and is now a free agent. But amid cheating rumors and these new drug allegations, his personal life has gone into a tailspin. Odom was last seen loading luggage into a car on Aug. 21.


Donald Trump is blasting New York's attorney general as a "political hack," and says he personally reviewed instructor applications for his Trump University, the AP reports.

The real estate tycoon made the comments Monday in phone interviews on two morning TV shows. He was responding to a $40 million lawsuit that state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed over the weekend.

The lawsuit claims Trump University promised to make students rich but instead steered them into expensive and mostly useless seminars.

It also alleges he never picked a single instructor, as he claimed.

Trump spoke on ABC's "Good Morning America" and NBC's "Today."

He said he didn't want to settle the lawsuit "on principle."

Schneiderman didn't immediately respond to requests for comment Monday.


Joey Crack might soon be known as Joey Tax, People reports.

On Monday, Fat Joe, whose real name is Joseph Cartagena, turned himself into a federal detention center in Miami for tax evasion, TMZ reports.

In December, the "Make It Rain" rapper - who shed 88 pounds in 2011 - pled guilty to failing to pay taxes during 2007 and 2008.

Cartagena will serve four months and pay a $15,000 fine, followed by a one-year supervised release.

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