People: Simon Cowell, Joan Collins, Shirley Jones, Valerie Harper and Lindsay Lohan

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When rumors began circulating last May that Simon Cowell was in a relationship with his friend's wife, Lauren Silverman, the TV host's lawyer responded with a strong denial, People reports.

"Any implication or statement that my client is engaged in adultery and has allegedly broken up the marriage of Ms. Silverman is not only false but reckless," Martin Singer told the New York Post at the time.

The high-profile Hollywood attorney also branded as "false and defamatory" any suggestion that the "X-Factor" host's relationship with Silverman "has become more serious such that she is now getting a divorce so that Simon and she can be together."

Silverman, 36, is now pregnant with Cowell's child, and the TV host is reportedly named in divorce papers filed July 15 by her husband, real estate magnate Andrew Silverman, alleging adultery.

Neither Cowell nor any of his reps, including Singer, has commented since the pregnancy news broke.

A source tells People that Lauren Silverman was "definitely unhappy" in her marriage at the time she met Cowell, 53, and that their relationship wasn't the only factor in her split with her husband.

"It was probably not the best relationship when she first met Simon," the source says of the Silvermans' marriage. "It wasn't like they were blissfully in love at the time."

Andrew Silverman's brother, Alexander, told the Post, "It is an unbelievable story of betrayal. It is a sad story and a tragic story," E! News reports.

While on the stand, Simon could potentially be asked to reveal his financial information to the court - he is currently said to be worth around $350 million.


Hollywood legend Joan Collins, 80, is livid at fellow icon Shirley Jones, insisting she's NOT some porn-watching swinger pervert and never was - despite claims in Jones' new book.

Sources tell TMZ that Collins - famous for the '80s prime-time soap "Dynasty" - is angry about one anecdote in particular, which Jones, 79, recounts in her book "Shirley Jones: A Memoir," a story about the first time the two met in the late '60s and a four-person sex party nearly broke out.

According to the book, Jones and her then-husband Jack Cassidy were at the home of Collins and Tony Newley for dinner and after dinner, Newley proposed they all get naked and watch porn together. Jones writes, "It was clear what Tony was leading up to - swinging."

Jones, 79, says she turned down the offer - and now, sources say, Collins is accusing her of libel, insisting the story is bogus.

Collins sent Jones' publisher, Simon & Schuster, a cease and desist letter after the book was published, demanding a retraction, and TMZ reports Jones and the publisher caved ... agreeing to remove Collins' name from the book.

A representative for Collins said the publisher has agreed to remove Collins' name from Jones' e-book immediately, as well as in future reprints. As for the books already on shelves, Joan is out of luck.

Collins told TMZ: "We all make mistakes. I've made a few myself, but not with Mrs. Jones. I'm a serial monogamist."


The UP cable channel said Valerie Harper is filming a TV movie in Canada.

The movie, titled "The Town That Came A-Courtin'," is based on a novel by Ronda Rich and also stars Lauren Holly, Cameron Bancroft and Lucie Guest, The Associated Press reports.

UP, which described the movie as an uplifting romance, said Wednesday it welcomed the "inspirational" Harper as part of the project.

In March, the 73-year-old actress said she's been diagnosed with a rare incurable brain cancer but that she intended to live each moment fully.

Harper gained fame playing Rhoda Morgenstern on television's "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and its spinoff "Rhoda."

UP's "The Town That Came A-Courtin' " will air in January, the channel said. It's being shot in Vancouver, British Columbia.


Lindsay Lohan has completed her court-ordered stay in rehab and must continue therapy into late next year, a judge said Wednesday.

The "Liz & Dick" star must meet with a therapist at least three times a week until November 2014, Superior Court Judge James R. Dabney said, following the treatment recommendation of Richard Taite, founder and CEO of Cliffside Malibu, the rehab facility where Lohan was recently residing, the AP reports.

Taite wrote Dabney a letter stating the need for Lohan to remain in therapy.

"Our entire clinical team is in unanimous agreement that if these sessions are not required by the court and attendance verified once a month to ensure accountability, it is a setup for almost certain failure," Taite wrote.

The judge's ruling calls for Lohan to receive 18 months of therapy and gives her credit for the three months of rehab that she has just completed.

If the actress is traveling, she can meet with her therapist via videoconferencing software, the judge said.

Lohan, 27, was not present at the hearing meant to update Dabney on her progress.

The actress remains on probation for a pair of cases involving the theft of a necklace and lying to police about driving when her sports car slammed into a dump truck on Pacific Coast Highway in June 2012.

Taite praised Lohan's progress in recent months.

"We couldn't be happier with the progress Ms. Lohan has made in building a solid foundation from which to continue the excellent work she has begun here at Cliffside Malibu," he wrote.

Lohan started her treatment at the Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage and was later transferred to Cliffside Malibu. Her next court date is scheduled for November 2014.

The actress's latest film, "The Canyons," will have a limited theatrical release in New York and Los Angeles this month. She has signed a deal on OWN to appear in an eight-part series based on her life and will be interviewed by Oprah Winfrey, also this month.

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