People: Steve Martin, Pierce Brosnan, Alec Baldwin


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Steve Martin is a lucky guy: A stranger found his wallet on a Wilkes-Barre street and returned it to the entertainer, The Associated Press reports.

Martin apparently lost his wallet while bicycling before performing Tuesday night. Will Beekman, programming director at the concert hall where Martin performed, says a man working on a city street found the wallet. He knew Martin's bluegrass show was in town, so he contacted the concert hall to say he'd found it.

Beekman says Martin insisted on thanking the man in person, but he wasn't sure whether the man got a reward. The wallet had Martin's driver's license and credit cards but no cash. Beekman says he didn't get the man's name.

Pierce Brosnan returned to work following the death of his daughter, Charlotte, from ovarian cancer, People reports.

The actor was seen on set Tuesday shooting action scenes in Belgrade, Serbia, for the upcoming film "November Man," a spy thriller based on the novels by Bill Granger.

According to a press release, the movie follows an ex-CIA operative who is brought back in on a dangerous mission, pitted against his former pupil in a deadly game involving CIA and Russian officials.

Brosnan, 60, reportedly left the set to be with his daughter during her final days. Charlotte, who was 41, died June 28 in London.

"Charlotte fought her cancer with grace and humanity, courage and dignity," Brosnan, who lost his wife and Charlotte's mother to the same disease in 1991, said in a statement. "Our hearts are heavy with the loss of our beautiful dear girl. We pray for her and that the cure for this wretched disease will be close at hand soon," the actor continues. "We thank everyone for their heartfelt condolences."

Alec Baldwin is done with Twitter -- and maybe even acting, People reports.

Deleting his Twitter account after lashing out at a British journalist who claimed Baldwin's wife, Hilaria, was Tweeting during James Gandolfini's funeral -- Baldwin later apologized for the remarks -- the "Blue Jasmine" actor defended his decision to forgo the social media service to Vanity Fair on Monday.

"I went to Jimmy Gandolfini's funeral, and when I was there I realized Jimmy Gandolfini didn't have Twitter. Jimmy Gandolfini was so beloved as a person, and he was so admired as an actor," and he didn't care about social media Baldwin, 55, said.

He continued, "I really learned a lesson at the funeral. I said to myself, This is all a waste of time. Meaning it's fun sometimes, but less and less and less. It's just another chink in your armor for people to come and kill you. I stopped and said to myself, I'm going to try where I just don't do this anymore."

With a baby on the way -- Baldwin is also dad to 17-year-old aspiring model Ireland Basinger Baldwin with ex-wife Kim Basinger -- Twitter might just be the first step in Baldwin's desire to lead a more private life.

"I'm having a baby. And everyone has seen how certain things have played out with my daughter, which has been very painful. It's been really unpleasant. That has consequences, and I do not want that to happen with my next child.

"I have one dream in my life and that is that this daughter I'm having -- she comes to me about seven or eight years from now, she has a friend, and she's at her house and she says, 'Daddy, Susie's mom says you used to be on TV. Daddy, is that true?' " he said. "She has no knowledge of me as a public person. That would be heaven for me."

When asked if this meant he was quitting acting, Baldwin replied, "That would be the greatest thing in the world."

But while he would "love to" say goodbye to show business, he added, "if I could find something else to do."

people

First Published July 5, 2013 4:00 AM


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