People: Reese Witherspoon, John Galliano, Khloe Kardashian and Al Michaels


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Reese Witherspoon has publicly apologized for her behavior in Atlanta after her husband, Jim Toth, was pulled over on suspicion of driving while intoxicated, People reports.

She released the following statement through her rep.

"Out of respect for the ongoing legal situation, I cannot comment on everything that is being reported right now. But I do want to say, I clearly had one drink too many and I am deeply embarrassed about the things I said," the statement says.

It continues: "It was definitely a scary situation, and I was frightened for my husband, but that is no excuse. I was disrespectful to the officer who was just doing his job. The words I used that night definitely do not reflect who I am. I have nothing but respect for the police, and I'm very sorry for my behavior."

Toth, 42, faces a DUI charge after driving in the wrong lane while the actress, 37, was arrested for disorderly conduct, according to the Atlanta Department of Corrections.

According to a police report obtained by Variety, once Toth was arrested, an agitated Witherspoon exited the car but was instructed to get back in. The officer then detailed how she resisted as he grabbed her arms and her husband tried to calm her down.

As the report states, "Mrs. Witherspoon asked, 'Do you know my name?' I answered, 'No, I don't need to know your name.' I then added, 'right now.' Mrs. Witherspoon stated, 'You're about to find out who I am.' "

But she's certainly not the only one feeling regretful.

Toth "feels awful that he involved Reese in the situation," a source close to the CAA agent tells People. "He made a bad decision and it certainly made things worse that he dragged her into it."

Toth and Witherspoon were arrested and briefly jailed early Friday morning.

Now, says the source, Toth, "has to pay the consequences, bottom line. He gets that."

Adds a second source: "It's embarrassing for him. He'll have to explain himself to his bosses."

As for his drinking (Toth blew a .139 on his sobriety test; the legal limit in Georgia is .08), the source says that the couple will reflect on the events of last week.

"Jim has always been a big social drinker," adds the first source. "A lot of his job is being social. He's out to lunch or dinner almost every day of the week, schmoozing clients and taking business meetings."

"[The arrest is] just going to make the two of them stop and pause, and think about maybe how much Jim's drinking plays a role in their lives -- if it does or not," the source says.

But as Toth and Witherspoon consider their next steps and the effects of the arrest on their family and their careers, they may take further action. "No one would be surprised," a third source tells People, "if Jim goes to rehab."

The couple's court hearing was originally set for Monday morning but has been rescheduled for May 22.

John Galliano is continuing his path back to the fashion world with a planned stop at Parsons The New School of Design in New York City, The Associated Press reports.

The college said Monday that Galliano will teach a master class that will address the "challenges and complications" of leading a design house.

Parsons said the spring workshop will give students the opportunity to have a "frank conversation" with the designer.

Galliano was creative director at Christian Dior when he was fired in 2011 for an anti-Semitic rant, which is a crime in France. He's currently involved in a lawsuit against his former employer.

He began a temporary artist residency at the studio of Oscar de la Renta in New York earlier this year.

The Parsons statement said Galliano has tried to make amends for his behavior.

Junot Diaz and Louise Erdrich are among the finalists for a literary prize chosen by the American Library Association, the AP reports.

Diaz's "This Is How You Lose Her" and Erdrich's "The Round House" are nominees for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Also contending for the $5,000 award is Richard Ford's "Canada."

Finalists for the nonfiction category, also worth $5,000, are Jill Lepore's "The Mansion of Happiness," Timothy Egan's "Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher" and David Quammen's "Spillover."

The library association announced the nominees Monday. Medals will be given to the winners June 30 at the association's annual conference in Chicago. Established in 2012, the awards are made possible by a grant from the Carnegie Corp.

Khloe Kardashian is left out following the latest game of musical chairs on "The X Factor," People reports.

Fox said Monday that while Mario Lopez is returning this fall as host of Simon Cowell's music competition series, Kardashian will not be joining him.

Cowell's series, which has never quite met ratings expectations, is in the midst of turnover with its judging panel, too.

Cowell and Demi Lovato will be returning, but Britney Spears and record producer Antonio "L.A." Reid left and have not been replaced yet.

Snoop Dogg had a little trouble celebrating his favorite day of the year, E! News reports.

The rapper held his annual Snoop Lion 420 Festival in Los Angeles on Saturday, where he invited "celebrity friends and members of the general public for a joyous marijuana celebration," according to the party's description.

But he didn't even get to hang out with his fellow cannabis enthusiasts, because the cops got there first.

The LAPD confirms to E! News that the public event was shut down on Saturday afternoon just as Snoop was arriving because "there were too many people, fire access issues, parking issues and noise problems. There was also a van transporting people to a parking lot which had no permit."

They add that "it was handled very peacefully" and that Snoop was "very cooperative." No arrests were made.

Regardless, the celeb wasn't about to let 4/20 go to waste (especially with preparations already made), so he just moved the party elsewhere and celebrated with a few friends.

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