People: Barbara Walters; Condoleezza Rice; Chris Evert and Lindsay Davenport; Patrick Dempsey


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Veteran journalist and "The View" host Barbara Walters was hospitalized on Saturday night after falling on steps during a pre-inauguration party at the British ambassador's residence. Walters, 83, cut her forehead and was taken to a hospital immediately. A spokesman for ABC told Entertainment Weekly that Walters remained in the hospital under observation and was not able to contribute as planned to ABC News' inauguration coverage.

Stephen Colbert's (that's Colbert with a silent "T") failed campaign to represent South Carolina in Congress doesn't mean there won't be a Colbert in the running -- his sister, Elizabeth Colbert-Busch ("T" in Colbert is not silent), is about to launch a campaign of her own. The Washington Post reports that she will file paperwork today with the South Carolina Democratic Party to run in the special election to fill Rep. Tim Scott's old seat.

Colbert-Bush, whose brother is the star of Comedy Central's "Colbert Report" (both "T's" are silent), is director of business development for Clemson University's Restoration Institute. She will run as a Democrat. Former Gov. Mark Sanford -- the Republican known for his phantom hike on the Appalachian Trail -- also has announced he'll run for the seat.

Stephen Colbert was suffering with the flu last week when he postponed an appearance at the University of Pittsburgh.

Condoleezza Rice has been added as a contributor to CBS News, an announcement made Sunday when she was a panelist on the network's "Face the Nation" program. Anchor Bob Schieffer said, "Everybody knows that Condoleezza Rice was President Bush's secretary of state, but I'm very pleased to announce that she has a new job as of today." Rice is a poli-sci professor at Stanford University.

Chris Evert and Lindsay Davenport are taking a swing at acting as guest stars on "CSI," according to the Associated Press. Some script revisions were in order, though, when the retired tennis champions shot their scenes.

Evert, Davenport and tennis commentator Justin Gimelstob all play themselves on Wednesday's episode of the CBS series starring Ted Danson and Elisabeth Shue, a friend of Evert's.

According to Evert, the original script called for Davenport to find the body of a female pro player that sets the episode in motion.

Evert recalled thinking: "Oh my God, Lindsay has a scene where she has to act."

"She never likes attention," Evert said.

Davenport read the script and said, "I had a panic attack. I was like, 'There's no way.' "

By the time Evert arrived at Calabasas Tennis Club about 20 miles outside Los Angeles for filming, Gimelstob was being fingered as the suspect.

"Most things that come to me that are outside my comfort zone are things that I don't want to do," Davenport said. "You either have that personality or you don't."

Gimelstob egged both Evert and Davenport on, although Evert didn't need too much persuasion. She hosted "Saturday Night Live" in 1989 and played a commentator in the movie "Wimbledon."

Shue is a big tennis fan and urged the "CSI" writers to pen an episode involving the sport. She's played in Evert's charity event in Florida and the Hall of Famer said the actress's game makes her "one of the best women celebrities I've ever seen."

???Grey???s Anatomy??? star and racing enthusiast Patrick Dempsey has formed a motor racing team with soccer player Alessandro Del Piero, the AP reports. Dempsey/Del Piero Racing has submitted an entry for the Le Mans 24-hour race in June and will run two cars in the American Le Mans Series from March. The U.S.-based team will have three riders in the 24-hour race ??? Dempsey and American veterans Joe Foster and Michael Avenatti. Drivers for the ALMS series have not been announced, but Del Piero is not expected to have a driving role.

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