People: Kate and Will, Piers Morgan, Hugh Grant, the Kardashians


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The tabloids are calling it a royal snub; we just think it's the usual holiday family juggling act. Kate and Will, aka the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, have opted to spend Christmas with the Middletons rather than the Windsors, according to Reuters -- but Prince William had to get Queen Elizabeth's permission first. So it will be Bucklebury instead of Buckingham Palace, and why not? Kate has been suffering from continued morning sickness, even after being released from the hospital, so it's only natural she'd want to have her Mum close by to make her some camomile tea.

CNN talk-show host Piers Morgan is a strong advocate for gun control -- just last week he called a guest on his show, "Piers Morgan Tonight," an "unbelievably stupid man" for opposing an assault rifle ban. Mr. Morgan is also British, and a number of gun-rights supporters in this country wish he would shut up and go home. More than 31,400 people have, as of this writing, signed a petition on the White House's e-petition website to have him deported, according to The Associated Press. "Bring it on," Mr. Morgan said via Twitter, laughing off the effort and tweeting to followers, "If I do get deported from America wanting fewer gun murders, are there any other countries that will have me?" No word from the White House, which is supposed to respond to any petition with more than 25,000 signatures.

The man who was recently dubbed by Jon Stewart as his worst guest ever has nonetheless come into a pile of money just in time for the holidays. On Friday, Hugh Grant settled his phone-hacking claim against Rupert Murdoch's media company News International, according to USA Today. Mr. Grant was one of 178 people who sued the company for phone hacking after Mail on Sunday published a story in 2007 about problems in the actor's relationship with Jemima Khan, a leggy British beauty and daughter of late billionaire financier Sir James Goldsmith, who was married to Imran Khan, one-time cricket star and wanna-be Pakistani leader.

Got that?

Anyway, Mr. Grant believed the story could have been written only after hacking into his voice mail, with the tabloid describing "mysterious plummy messages" left by another woman.

Mr. Grant, who tweeted a mea culpa saying Jon Stewart was right to call him a pain, actually seems a decent sort. His attorney noted that the actor will donate his settlement -- said to be a substantial sum -- to his Hacked Off campaign for free and accountable media.

And finally, just in time for 2013, a new nationwide survey reveals which celebrities Americans do not want to read about in 2013. And guess who leads the pack? That's right: the Kardashians, the Lohans and Honey Boo-Boo.

The online survey of 2,309 U.S. adults ages 18 and older, conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of Zebra Pen Corp., found that the Kardashian family topped the list of celebrities most people would like to see "written off" in 2013, with 70 percent.

The Lohan family came in a close second at 68 percent and exploited child pageant princess Honey Boo-Boo at 65 percent. Justin Beiber came in a distant fourth at 47 percent, followed by a Chris Brown, Donald Trump tie at 44 percent, and the cast of TV's "Two and a Half Men," 35 percent. Interestingly, those with a college degree or higher (51 percent) are significantly more likely to report wanting Trump to never be heard from in 2013 than those with some college education or less (41 percent).

"Americans are inundated with news about famous people," said Chris Farley, director of marketing at Zebra Pen Corp. "We thought it would be fun to conduct a light-hearted survey to find out which celebs have been a bit overexposed in 2012. Now that we know the perceptions of the country, we'll see how the New Year shapes up for these ink-grabbing celebrities."

Ink-grabbing? Zebra Pen Corp.? Get it?

people


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