Author Neil Gaiman to talk 'Stardust' anniversary and more


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Neil Gaiman is coming to Oakland Wednesday to discuss the 15th-anniversary hardcover edition of "Stardust," a fantastical tale with magical illustrations by Charles Vess, as part of the Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures series. But when the prolific fantasy/horror/sci-fi writer gets going, there's a high probability that the conversation at Carnegie Music Hall will wander into other Gaiman-esque territory.

To foreshadow such a turn of events, he wrote in a recent blog post, "I will go to Pittsburgh for November 14th (come and see me! The evening will be Stardust themed, but I will undoubtedly talk about other things, especially The Ocean At The End of the Lane.)"

That title is due in June from Harper Collins. The author describes "The Ocean at the End of the Lane" on his blog as "a novel about memory and magic and survival, about the power of stories and the darkness inside each of us."

There's always a lot on the plate of Mr. Gaiman, a native of England who resides in Minneapolis. He is perhaps best known as creator and writer of the DC Comics series "Sandman"; novels such as "Stardust" (William Morrow, $30) and "American Gods"; and horror-fantasies for children such as "Coraline" and the Newbery Award-winning "The Graveyard Book." Last year, he and his wife, Dresden Dolls singer Amanda Palmer, toured the West Coast with a program of songs and readings.

Upcoming is a "Doctor Who" episode reintroducing the archenemy Cybermen. The writer's previous episode for the long-running BBC series, "The Doctor's Wife," earned a Hugo Award.

"Neil Gaiman & An Evening of Stardust" begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15-$30 ($10 for students with a valid ID) at www.pittsburghlectures.org or 412-622-8866.

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First Published November 12, 2012 5:00 AM


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