'Twilight' director to speak at May summit in Pittsburgh


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Catherine Hardwicke, director of the first “Twilight” movie, is coming to Pittsburgh in mid-May for the Women in Film and Television International Summit.

Ms. Hardwicke, a native of the South Texas border town of McAllen, also directed “Red Riding Hood,” “The Nativity Story,” “Lords of Dogtown” and “Thirteen.”

She will be among 40 speakers who are part of the May 16-18 event also showcasing 30 panel discussions, two screenings and the Opal Awards being given to Deborah Acklin, CEO of WQED, and Dawn Keezer, director of the Pittsburgh Film Office.

Television and radio veteran Eleanor Schano will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award and Ms. Hardwicke with a Women in Film and Television International Award.

Ms. Hardwicke will be part of a panel discussion about women in the director’s chair with Melissa Martin (“The Bread, My Sweet”) and producer Paula Gregg.

Also participating during the event: Kim Moses, producer of “Ghost Whisperer”; CNN News correspondent Martin Savidge; Loren Smith, who worked on TV’s “King of the Hill”; Russell Streiner, head of the film office board and a producer of “Night of the Living Dead: and keynote speaker Mary Lynn Ryan, a CNN bureau chief.

The summit draws together film, television and new media talent from around the world. The summit is open to the public.

Tickets for Friday's screening of “Gideon’s Army” are available as a separate ticket, $10 each at the door.

For registration, more information on summit and Opal Awards, http://www.WIFTISummit.org


Barbara Vancher: bvancheri@post-gazette.com and 412-263-1632.

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